prog Archive

Hundred-word Reviews: New Rock/pop

More albums that deserve your time, but that I haven’t the time nor space to cover in a more in-depth fashion. Levin Minnemann Rudess – s/t This project brings together three of the busiest, most in-demand players on the scene today. Tony Levin (King Crimson) has played on literally thousands of sessions. Marco Minnemann is

Hundred Word Reviews: February 2014, Part One

The backlog of music here at Musoscribe World Headquarters has gotten massive; it’s nearly overwhelming. Anyone who tells you that there’s no good new music out there clearly doesn’t deserve your attention. These albums, however, do. That said, the only practical way for me to cover them is to do so in a truncated fashion.

Concert Preview: Welcome (Back) to The Machine

New York-based Pink Floyd tribute band The Machine have long made Asheville NC’s Orange Peel the first or an early stop on their annual winter tour itinerary. The group routinely attracts a packed crowd to the venue for its sound and vision spectacular, a live recreation of the music of one of rock’s best-loved and

Digital December

Longtime readers will know that I review digital releases only in the rarest of cases. Only slightly more often will I cover physical releases for which I have access only to a download (or even more rarely, a stream). However, on special occasions, I’m happy to make exceptions. Said occasions are generally this: the music

Album Review: RPWL — A Show Beyond Man and Time

The last time anything truly new was released underneath the Pink Floyd banner (not counting expanded reissues of 70s albums) it was way back in 1994. That was almost twenty years ago. So if a newer band puts out music that strongly echoes (heh) the Floyd, the argument can be made: hey, nobody else was

Progtastic Capsule Reviews for November, Part 1

I am unashamed to admit it: I like progressive rock. I like it a lot. And yet I can’t trot out the boilerplate statement, “The fourteen-year-old boy in me loves his prog,” because at fourteen – even at seventeen – I didn’t really like the stuff. Which is a bit odd, seeing as those years

What’s Old is New Again in November 2013, Part Two

Three more capsule reviews of new-to-you live albums, continuing from yesterday’s blog entry. The Modern Jazz Quartet – Lost Tapes: Germany 1956-1958 Where modern jazz is concerned, taste and restraint need not be synonymous. And there’s no better exemplar of the first without the second than The Modern Jazz Quartet. Throughout its forty-plus year history,

Fall Capsule Reviews, Part Three

I wasn’t kidding when I wrote of having a massive backlog; here are four more capsule reviews. Don’t infer that these releases are somehow lesser than those receiving more in-depth coverage; these are all worth further investigation. As per usual, 150 words per review is my limit here. Breaking Laces – Come Get Some This

Directed Energy: The Joe Satriani Interview, Part Two

Continued from Part One… Bill Kopp: You’ve used keyboards before, of course, but the new album (and the last couple) features Mike Keneally, as opposed to on some of the earlier albums where you sometimes overdubbed keys yourself. Does having Mike on board allow you to expand what the keyboard is able to do in

Directed Energy: The Joe Satriani Interview, Part One

Joe Satriani is that unique guitarist who is both revered by the crowd that digs technically amazing musicians, yet possesses a great deal of mainstream appeal. That success is a function of the fact that he writes accessible, catchy and memorable melodies, as opposed to merely crafting vehicles upon which to lay a bunch of