punk Archive

For Destroy Boys, The Personal is Political

Co-led by guitarist Violet Mayugba and singer Alexia Roditis, Sacramento punk band Destroy Boys debuted with the 2015 studio EP Sorry Mom. The band’s profile got an early boost when they were favorably mentioned in a 2016 Rolling Stone feature on Green Day. And by 2018 — around the time of the release of their

Album Review: The Gun Club — Fire of Love

Blixa Sounds released an expanded reissue of the Gun Club’s Miami in 2000, and now their similar treatment of the Los Angeles punk band’s debut album, Fire of Love, is getting similar treatment. Oddly – at least to these ears – it’s more accessible than the second LP. Yes, Jeffrey Lee Pierce’s open relationship with

Album Review: Mumps — Rock & Roll This, Rock & Roll That

American pop culture consumers of a certain age (aka television viewers) will recall An American Family, a groundbreaking PBS documentary series that first aired in 1973. Setting aside the fact that the program is to blame for the subsequent rise of “reality” (sic and ugh) television, it was nonetheless important in many ways. One of

The Rubinoos’ Pop-punk Nugget is Unearthed

It wasn’t just punk that arose as an alternative to what many viewed as the overblown, corporate-flavored excess of 1970s rock. Along with punk, a kind of proto-indie pop was bubbling under. And a notable laboratory for those endeavors was Beserkley Records. Founded in 1973 by Matthew King Kaufman, Beserkley introduced the likes of Earth

Book Review: Rudi Protrudi — As Times Gone

I’m on record as being an ardent Fuzztones fan. And while the band has created plenty of music to satisfy fans’ cravings for garagefuzzpunk, those similarly inclined are apt to be interested in anything in and around the band. Happily, Fuzztone Numero Uno, Rudi Proudi understands and appreciates that fat. That, or he finds that

Book Review: Rudi Protrudi — The Fuzztone

Note: While perusing the newest book by the Fuzztones’ Rudi Protrudi, I made a discovery: a review I wrote more than four years ago has somehow failed to be published here on Musoscribe. So here ’tis. Come back tomorrow to read about his newest title. Formed in 1980, the Fuzztones were on the crest of

Book Review: Shut Up You Animals!!! A Remembrance of Dirk Dirksen

Dirk Dirksen wasn’t known as musician, but his importance to the music history of San Francisco is substantial. Imagine a sort of Bill Graham writ small, with a perhaps unexpected interest in (and affinity for) the then-new punk rock and new wave, and you’ll have the beginnings of what he was all about. Dirksen –

30 Days Out, May 2021 #1: Mayday AVL, the Wooks, DeeOhGee, Doom Flamingo

The time last year the term social distancing was just starting to creep into wide usage. And use of the term pods to describe clusters of seating at concerts was a thoroughly alien concept. But here we are heading toward the middle of 2021, and while live shows are indeed returning, the ground rules are

The 411 on 415

Last November I wrote a cover story for SF Weekly; it focused on a series of reissue/compilation CDs on the Liberation Hall label. Those releases contained music originally released on 415 Records, an influential and trend-setting indie label based in San Francisco in the late ‘70s and early-to-mid 1980s. Founded by Howie Klein and Chris

Boxed Set Review: Iggy and the Stooges – From KO to Chaos

In music fan and critical circles, the concept of “blues police” comes up in conversation from time to time. Simply put, blues police is a pejorative term applied to self-anointed arbiters of What Is And Is Not Blues™. These auto-deputized lawgivers would have us believe that, say, Ana Popovic isn’t blues because she didn’t grow