May 20: Negativland: Stand By for Failure

WORLD PREMIERE of a new documentary about the acclaimed and controversial experimental group. Screening includes a special post-film Q&A with group members Mark Hosler and Jon Leidecker

WHAT: Music Movie Mondays Series: Negativland – Stand By for Failure
Special screening + moderated discussion hosted by Bill Kopp
WHERE: Grail Movie House, 17 Foundy Street, Asheville
WHEN: Monday, May 20 @ 7 p.m. /  Tickets $15 HERE


PAST SCREENINGS…


April 8: Linda Ronstadt – The Sound of My Voice

The GRAMMY Award winning documentary. As always with Music Movie Mondays, the evening features a post-screening discussion led by author and music journalist Bill Kopp (that’s me) provides an opportunity to share thoughts and insight on the film.

March 11: Athens, GA: Inside/Out

The acclaimed film documenting the Athens music scene. Featuring R.E.M., Pylon, B-52’s, Flat Duo Jets and more. As always with Music Movie Mondays, the evening features a post-screening discussion led by author and music journalist Bill Kopp (that’s me) provides an opportunity to share thoughts and insight on the film.

WHAT: Music Movie Mondays Series: Athens, GA: Inside/Out
Special screening + moderated discussion hosted by Bill Kopp
WHERE: Grail Movie House, 17 Foundy Street, Asheville

February 11: The Last Waltz

The classic late ’70s farewell concert film featuring The Band plus an all-star lineup of special guests. As always with Music Movie Mondays, the evening features a post-screening discussion led by author and music journalist Bill Kopp (that’s me) provides an opportunity to share thoughts and insight on the film.

January 8: Immediate Family

Filmmaker Denny Tedesco (The Wrecking Crew) has dug into the collective history of these important musicians, and the result is a new motion picture documentary, Immediate Family. Drawing from archival footage and contemporary interview with the musicians (and the artists for whom they provided their expertise), Immediate Family fills in the blanks of an important – yet often overlooked part of American popular music history.

December 11: A Hard Day’s Night

If you don’t know what this is, you’re probably on the wrong website.


November 13: The Stones and Brian Jones

(2013) 1hr 33min

The story of Rolling Stones founder and guitarist Brian Jones is explored in a new documentary, made with the close cooperation of Stones bassist Bill Wyman. A special November 13 one-night screening as part of the Music Movie Mondays series at Grail Movie House will be hosted by Asheville speaker, author and music journalist Bill Kopp.

The Rolling Stones are among the most important and influential groups in popular music. Their long run of hits began in the mid sixties, and they’re still going strong in 2023 – led by two founding members, Mick Jagger and Keith Richards. But it’s often forgotten that while Mick and Keith write the songs, it was another member – guitarist Brian Jones – who put the group together and was its original leader. Jones died tragically in 1969, weeks after being dismissed from the group he founded. Today his important contributions to the Rolling Stones are too often overlooked.

A new documentary film aims to set the record straight. Directed by Nick Broomfield, The Stones and Brian Jones takes a look at the life, music and death of the Rolling Stones founded. Drawing from private archives and firsthand recollections from family, colleagues, former girlfriends and (most significantly) former Stones bassist Bill Wyman, the film places Jones’ accomplishments withing the proper context. While Brian Jones didn’t write songs, his artistry – most notably his uncanny ability to make music with most any instrument – was a key to the group’s sound, character and development.

The Stones and Brian Jones doesn’t whitewash or hide from uncomfortable truths. The film addresses Jones’ fathering of at least five children by five women, his erratic behavior and abuse of drugs and alcohol. But those realities shouldn’t negate Jones’ importance as a musical force. And the documentary successfully weaves the various parts of Jones’ tragic life – including his fraught relationship with his parents – into a compelling if heartbreaking tale. Filled with insightful commentary from those who knew him best, and packed with rarely seen visuals, The Stones and Brian Jones highlights an important and too-seldom explored part of what helped earn the Rolling Stones the sobriquet “The World’s Greatest Rock and Roll Band.”

October 9: The Song Remains the SameMUSIC MOVIE MONDAYS with Bill Kopp - THE SONG REMAINS THE SAME

On Monday October 9, Kopp’s Music Movie Monday series at Grail Movie House will feature a screening of the Led Zeppelin concert film The Song Remains the Same, with a discussion to follow.

In the early to mid 1970s, Led Zeppelin reigned supreme in the world of rock. Rising from the ashes of seminal ‘60s band the Yardbirds, Led Zeppelin drew upon classic American blues for its sound, but added levels of power, sophistication, nuance and (sometimes) malevolence to create something remarkable and new. Every one of their studio albums – eight released between 1969 and 1979 – went multi-platinum, often many times over. Led Zeppelin concert tours were emblematic of the era, with the band playing ot packed arenas across the globe. The excess of that era was on full display: the group traveled in its own branded jet, and tales of backstage and hotel room mayhem were legion.

But at the center of it all was the music. And While most all of Led Zeppelin’s music enjoys critical acclaim commensurate with its commercial appeal, the band was arguably at the pinnacle of its creativity on 1973’s Houses of the Holy.

Touring in support of Houses of the Holy, Led Zeppelin would document its live show by filming a documentary, The Song Remains the Same. Crews captured the sound and visuals of the band’s multi-night engagement at New York City’s Madison Square Garden. The film was released to theaters in 1976; directed by Peter Clifton and Joe Massot, the film also included arty, impressionistic fantasy sequences; it’s very much an artifact of the hedonistic 1970s.

The October 9 screening of The Song Remains the Same will include a moderated discussion led by Bill Kopp. The event is sponsored by AshevilleFM. Don’t miss this special opportunity to convene with your fellow rock fans for this interactive evening.

WHAT: Music Movie Mondays Series: Led Zeppelin’s The Song Remains the Same
Special screening + moderated discussion hosted by Bill Kopp
WHERE: Grail Moviehouse, 17 Foundy Street, Asheville
WHEN: Monday, October 9 @ 7 p.m. / Tickets are $15 and likely to sell out!

By Popular Demand

The September 11 screening of Have you Got It Yet? The Story of Syd Barrett and Pink Floyd was a rousing success; the evening sold out. So Grail Movie House has scheduled an encore screening for Monday, September 18 @ 7pm. Once again Bill Kopp (that’s me) will introduce the film and lead a post-screening discussion. Don’t miss this opportunity to see one of the most compelling new documentaries, in a screening that’s part of the popular Music Movie Mondays series at Grail.

Tickets HERE.

 

Have You Got It Yet? The Story of Syd Barrett and Pink Floyd

A new documentary explores the mystery of what happened to the founder and leader of one of rock music/s most legendary bands. A special September 11 one-night screening as part of the Music Movie Mondays series at Grail Moviehouse will be hosted by Asheville speaker, author, music journalist and Pink Floyd authority Bill Kopp (that’s me!).

When Pink Floyd released their debut single, 1967’s “Arnold Layne,” it marked the beginning of a momentous chapter in music. The song showcased not only the psychedelic quality of the four-man group from Cambridge and London, but the songwriting prowess and unique vision of the band’s leader, Syd Barrett.

Guitarist and front man Roger Keith “Syd” Barrett was a promising artist, creating unique songs that both captured the zeitgeist of the burgeoning psychedelic movement and captured a particular kind of English whimsy, informed as much by poetry and fantasy as by LSD. The band’s first album, The Piper at the Gates of Dawn featured a bounty of songs that displayed Barrett’s unique and inimitable musical vision.

But little more than nine months after that album’s release, Barrett was gone from the group he had founded. Save for two erratic and deeply idiosyncratic solo albums and a handful of unfinished recordings, that would be the last the world would hear from the uniquely creative songwriter and musician. Completely leaving music behind, he went on to live a quiet life in Cambridge, finally passing away in 2006, nearly 40 years after leaving (or being dismissed from) Pink Floyd.

What happened? Did Syd suffer a mental breakdown? Did he succumb to the effects of too many LSD trips? Did he simply want to step out of the machinery of the music business? Or is the real story some combination of all of those things and more? Until now, Syd’s life has been the subject of speculation and conjecture. But with the cooperation of Barrett’s family and former band mates, director Roddy Bogawa explores the fascinating mystery that is the life and music of Syd Barrett.

Have You Got It Yet? The Story of Syd Barrett and Pink Floyd is a new authorized documentary that digs deep into the mystery that is Syd Barrett. As part of the Music Movie Mondays series, Grail Moviehouse in Asheville hosts a special one-night-only showing of the film. Presented by Asheville-based speaker, author and music journalist Bill Kopp (author of Reinventing Pink Floyd: From Syd Barrett to The Dark Side of the Moon) the evening will include a screening of the film followed by an interactive discussion.

Squaring the Circle (The Story of Hipgnosis)

A lively new film explores the history, cultural impact and enduring appeal of one of the great art and design groups. Squaring the Circle (The Story of Hipgnosis) is a 2023 documentary by Anton Corbijn; it’s the story of the team that led the visual side of the rock era.

Beginning in the late 1960s, the creative design team known as Hipgnosis created dozens of the most iconic, distinctive and memorable album covers in the history of popular music. Led by Aubrey “Po” Powell and Storm Thorgerson, Hipgnosis creative commissioned artwork for album covers by Pink Floyd, Black Sabbath, Peter Gabriel, ELO, Alan Parsons Project, 10cc, Emerson Lake & Palmer, Paul McCartney and Wings, Brand X, Bad Company, Al Stewart and literally hundreds of others. It’s safe to say that if you have a rock album collection, Hipgnosis’ stunning album cover art is all over it.

From their first album cover (Pink Floyd’s A Saucerful of Secrets in 1968) through one of their final projects (fitting enough, Led Zeppelin’s career-capping Coda in 1982) Hipgnosis was for many the visual component of the music. In those pre-music video days, album art and packaging was most listeners’ only visual representation of the music within. And Hipgnosis’ work has stood the test of time; their images are inextricably liked with the music of the rock era.

This new documentary features on-screen commentary and spirited reminiscences from David Gilmour, Roger Waters, Jimmy Page, Robert Plant, Paul McCartney, Peter Gabriel, Noel Gallagher and many others.

Head

The Monkees was quite popular during its year-and-a-half run NBC-TV. In light of the group’s enduring popularity, it’s remarkable to realize that they existed onscreen for such a brief time. And as is widely known, the four members — admittedly to varying degrees — bristled at the manner in which they were packaged and sold to the public. So it was in 1968 after the show had gone of the air that the group — with show creators Bob Rafelson and Bert Schneider and a friend of theirs named Jack Nicholson — decided to make a motion picture that would destroy once and for all their cuddly image.

That film was and is HEAD. Imagine The Monkees TV show expanded to movie length and dosed liberally with LSD, and you’ll begin to get a sense of what HEAD is like. The list of co-stars hints at the madness: Frank Zappa, Victor Mature, Annettte Funicello, Sonny Liston. “Weird” doesn’t even begin to describe it. Weirdly wonderful, too.

HEAD is not often screened these days. We had to jump through some hoops to get it for Music Movie Mondays. But we did, and we’re excited to share it with you.

Some 55 years after its original release, the willfully bizarre HEAD continues to fascinate, to entertain, to bewilder. Grail Moviehouse proudly presents a special one-night screening of the movie on Monday, July 10. Hosted by author, speaker and music journalist Bill Kopp, the evening will feature a screening of the film followed by an interactive discussion. HEAD is the latest in Grail Moviehouse’s ongoing series, Music Movie Mondays.

Monterey Pop

The Woodstock Music and Art Fair of August 1969 is often recalled as the beginning of the festival era, the spark that lit the fire. There’s some truth to that, but the real turning point – at which wider pop culture coincided with the concept of a massive music festival – all started in June 1967 at the Monterey Pop Festival.

That three-day event showcased both major stars and up-and-comers; the lineup included now-legendary performances by Otis Redding, The Who, Jimi Hendrix, Jefferson Airplane, The Byrds, The Grateful Dead and more than two dozen other acts. A rousing success, the festival created a template for the festival movement. And documentary filmmaker D.A. Pennebaker was there with a crew, capturing the concert for history. His acclaimed film, Monterey Pop premiered in theaters in December 1968.

Nearly 55 years after its original release, the excitement, appeal and influence of the concert festival and its documentary film continue to endure. Grail Moviehouse proudly presents a special one-night screening of the movie on Monday, June 12. Hosted by author, speaker and music journalist Bill Kopp, the evening will feature a screening of the film followed by an interactive discussion. is the latest in Grail Moviehouse’s ongoing series, Music Movie Mondays.

Quadrophenia

In October 1973, The Who released their ambitious 2LP set Quadrophenia. Following on from songwriter Pete Townshend’s previous conceptual/narrative works Tommy and (the aborted) Lifehouse, Quadrophenia was superior in most every way: better songwriting, more muscular arrangements, and – perhaps most significantly – a compelling story line that one could actually follow.

So it was perhaps no surprise that six years later, a film version of Quadrophenia appeared. Following the story of Jimmy, the story was set against the ‘mods vs. rockers’ scene of mid 1960s Britain. Filmed in and around Brighton, Quadrophenia is a dramatic tour de force and succeeds on many levels.

Unlike Tommy, it’s not a musical, and it features proper acting. Sting (The Police) makes a dramatic turn as Ace Face, and Toyah Willcox (today also known as the spouse of Robert Fripp) is in fine form as well.

The highly popular monthly Music Movie Mondays series at Grail Moviehouse in Asheville’s River Arts District continues with a special one-night-only screening of Quadrophenia, with a moderated discussion (led by me) to follow. May 8 at 7pm.

What the Hell Happened to Blood Sweat & Tears?

UPDATE: Screen #1 is sold out but Grail has opened a second simultaneous screen. USE THIS TIX LINK.

All tickets are $15 and include General Admission Ticket plus Introduction and Moderated Discussion with Bill Kopp and Founding Member of Blood, Sweat & Tears, Mr. Jim Fielder, following the movie.

In June 1970, hot off their spectacular Grammy® win for Album of the Year (besting The Beatles’ “Abbey Road”), Blood, Sweat & Tears becomes the first American rock band to perform behind the Iron Curtain, doing concerts in Yugoslavia, Romania and Poland on a tour sponsored by the U.S. State Department.

Like much of the youth in America, band members have been outspoken and critical of the Nixon administration and the Vietnam War. The Iron Curtain Tour seems to be a curious decision by the band, which was at the very height of their popularity.

Upon their return, the band becomes a victim of the significant societal upheaval and culture wars in a polarized America, divided as much then as it is now.  Political criticism typically comes from one side or the other. But in 1970, Blood, Sweat & Tears find themselves in the crossfire from both the Right AND the Left and the group suffers greatly as a result. Suddenly, they are no longer hip and cool and lose support from fans, the media, concert bookers and the recording industry.

In short, the Right is outraged by the U.S. government footing the bill for an anti-war/anti-Nixon rock band to tour overseas and refer to Blood, Sweat & Tears members as “Communists”.  The Left is critical of the band for appearing to be an instrument of the U.S. government and/or the CIA.

Through documentary footage shot during the Iron Curtain tour (and thought to be lost) and present-day interviews with band members and historians, as well as the unsealing of government records, WHAT THE HELL HAPPENED TO BLOOD, SWEAT & TEARS? unravels the details of this extraordinary year in the life of the band.

Rock ‘N’ Roll High School

“Riff Randell, rock ‘n’ roller.”

That’s how P.J. Soles introduces her character in Rock N Roll High School, the cult film that built upon a foundation of B-movies and served it up to a generation raised on a diet of second-wave rebellious rock ‘n’ roll, aka punk. Allan Arkush’s film starred The Ramones, non actors all, alongside Warhol denizens Paul Bartel and Mary Woronov. The clash of (sub)cultural icons makes for a rousing, fun and unashamedly of-its-time movie.

Rock N Roll High School spawned a cult following, writ small. You may recall that the underground success of The Rocky Horror Picture Show manifested in fans attending the movie in theaters dressed in costumes that copied (or at least followed on from) those on the screen, and rather than remaining seated in the darkened movie house, they jumped up and participated in the film.

Well, in the very late ‘70s, fans of Rock N Roll High School often did the same thing. They were inspired by the silly antics, the self-consciously cliché plot line, and the great music. And while we won’t actively encourage similar behavior at the Grail Moviehouse in Asheville on March 27, neither will we prohibit it. So come join us for a screening of the cult classic Rock N Roll High School, followed by an interactive discussion to follow. It’s the latest in our ongoing series of Music Movie Mondays, hosted by Bill Kopp (that’s me).

WHAT: Music Movie Mondays Series: Rock ‘N’ Roll High School
Special screening and moderated discussion hosted by Bill Kopp

WHERE: Grail Moviehouse, 17 Foundy Street, Asheville

WHEN: Monday, March 27 @ 7 p.m. / Tickets are $15 (and likely to sell out!)

WATTSTAX

SCREEN #1 SOLD OUT; TIX STILL AVAILABLE FOR SCREEN #2.

“A candid, colorful and deeply meaningful sociocultural time capsule, one that captured the Black community at the height of its political energy and optimism.” (Washington Post)

In August 1972, acclaimed Memphis, Tennessee-based Stax Records presented Wattstax, an all-star concert featuring the label’s roster. Held in the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, the marathon concert featured soul, funk, r&b, gospel jazz, pop and blues. Performers included Albert King, The Staple Singers, Rufus and Carla Thomas, The Bar-Kays and many others; the performance was headlined by a set featuring Isaac Hayes, then at the apex of his career; earlier that year Hayes won an Oscar and several Grammy Awards for his Shaft soundtrack). The concert was designed to commemorate the seventh anniversary of the Watts riots; as a gift to the community, tickets were priced at $1. More than 110,000 people attended the concert, a film of which was released to theaters in 1973.

Commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Wattstax concert film, Grail Moviehouse proudly presents a special one-night screening of the movie on Monday, February 13. Co-hosted by author, speaker and music journalist Bill Kopp and former Motown staff writer Sidney Barnes, the evening will feature a screening of the film followed by an interactive discussion. Wattstax is the third in Grail Moviehouse’s ongoing series, Music Movie Mondays.

“Going to the movies has always been a kind of communal experience,” says Kopp, host of Music Movie Mondays. “Especially in this post-lockdown era, the opportunity to not only watch a film but then to discuss it with others is something even more special. And music-related films lend themselves remarkably well to this kind of shared, interactive experience.”

Kopp’s co-host for the event, Sidney Barnes is a fellow resident of Western North Carolina. A staff songwriter for Motown Records during its heyday, Barnes also fronted psychedelic soul group Rotary Connection, one of the most prominent and successful multiracial pop groups of the ‘60s and early 1970. For the Wattstax discussion, Barnes – who at age 82 is still an active performer and recording artist – will share his unique perspective and experiences as part of the music industry of that era.

Music Movie Mondays is sponsored by AshevilleFM. Hosted by Asheville-based author and music journalist Bill Kopp, Grail Moviehouse presents a special screening of Concert for George on Monday, February 13 @ 7:30 pm and Sponsored by AshevilleFM, Grail Moviehouse’s screening of Wattstax will feature a brief introduction by host Bill Kopp. Then we’ll watch the film together; afterward, we’ll engage in a moderated discussion featuring co-host Sidney Barnes.

The one-night-only screening of Wattstax is the third and latest in the series of Music Movie Mondays at Grail Moviehouse. Every month, we’ll watch and discuss new releases, classics and cult favorites.

WHAT: Music Movie Mondays Series: Wattstax
Special screening and moderated discussion hosted by Bill Kopp with special co-host Sidney Barnes
WHERE: Grail Moviehouse, 17 Foundy Street, Asheville
WHEN: Monday, February 13 @ 7:30 p.m. / Tickets are $15 and likely to sell out!


Concert for George

UPDATE: The first screening at 7pm is SOLD OUT, but due to high demand, Grail Moviehouse has added a SECOND screening at 7:10pm. Discussion afterward (for ticketholders of both shows) is included. Link below gets you tix to that screening. (UPDATE: second screening is also sold out)

On November 29, 2002, one year after the passing of George Harrison, Olivia Harrison and longtime friend Eric Clapton organized a performance tribute in his honor. Held at London’s Royal Albert Hall, the momentous evening featured George’s songs, and music he loved, performed by a lineup that included Clapton, Joe Brown, Dhani Harrison, Jools Holland, Jeff Lynne, Paul McCartney, Monty Python, Tom Petty, Billy Preston, Ravi and Anoushka Shankar, Ringo Starr and many more.

Directed by David Leland (whose credits include the feature Wish You Were Here, HBO’s Band Of Brothers and the Traveling Wilburys video “Handle With Care”), CONCERT FOR GEORGE captures stunning renditions of some of the most significant music of the 20th century, including “While My Guitar Gently Weeps” (featuring Clapton on guitar, McCartney on piano and Starr on drums), “Taxman” (performed by Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers) and “The Inner Light” (covered by Jeff Lynne and Anoushka Shankar). Lynne, Harrison’s longtime friend and collaborator, produced the audio elements of the concert, while Clapton oversaw the entire proceedings as Musical Director.

Hosted by Asheville-based author and music journalist Bill Kopp, Grail Moviehouse presents a special screening of the Grammy-winning film on Monday, January 9 @ 7pm and sponsored by AshevilleFM. After a brief introduction, we’ll watch the film together. And then afterward, we’ll engage in a moderated discussion about George Harrison.

The event is the latest in a series of Music Movie Mondays at Grail Moviehouse. We’ll watch and discuss new releases, classics and cult favorites.

WHAT: Music Movie Mondays Series: Concert for George
Special screening and moderated discussion hosted by Bill Kopp
WHERE: Grail Moviehouse, 17 Foundy Street, Asheville
WHEN: Monday, January 9 @ 7 p.m. (sold out)  additional screening at 7:10pm (sold out) / Tickets are $15


IN THE COURT OF THE CRIMSON KING

UPDATE: The first and second screens are SOLD OUT, but due to high demand, Grail Moviehouse has added a THIRD screening (with discussion), at 4pm. Link below gets you tix to that screening.

One of rock music’s most original and uncompromising groups is also one of its longest-lasting: founded in 1969 by guitarist Robert Fripp, King Crimson has changed the landscape of modern music more than a few times during its on-and-off existence. Fripp is the band’s sole mainstay; more than 20 musicians have passed through its ranks.

But some of the most groundbreaking and important musicians – especially in progressive rock – have been members of King Crimson: Greg Lake (ELP), Ian McDonald (Foreigner), John Wetton (UK, Asia), Bill Bruford (Yes), Gavin Harrison (Porcupine Tree) Boz Burrell (Bad Company), Adrian Belew (Talking Heads, David Bowie), Pat Mastelotto (Mr. Mister, Stick Men) and Tony Levin are just a few.

The ever-changing King Crimson ushered in the progressive rock era at the end of the ‘60s, pioneered progressive metal in the 1970s, combined “worldbeat” textures with Western music in ‘80s and explored industrial and post-rock styles in the 1990s and beyond. On the occasion of the group’s 50th anniversary, filmmaker Toby Amies set out to make a documentary exploring the history of the band.

The resulting motion picture is as odd, idiosyncratic, challenging and ultimately entertaining as King Crimson itself. As the press kit for In the Court of the Crimson King: King Crimson at 50 asserts:

What began as a straightforward documentary about the cult rock band
King Crimson as it turned 50, mutated into an exploration of time, death,
family, and the transcendent power of music to change lives. But with jokes.

Hosted by Asheville-based author and music journalist Bill Kopp, Grail Moviehouse presents a special screening of the film on Monday, December 12 @ 7pm and sponsored by AshevilleFM. After a brief introduction, we’ll watch the film together. And then afterward, we’ll engage in a moderated discussion about King Crimson.

The event is the first in a series of Music Movie Mondays at Grail Moviehouse. We’ll watch and discuss new releases, classics and cult favorites.

WHAT: Music Movie Mondays Series: In the Court of the Crimson King: King Crimson at 50
Special screening and moderated discussion hosted by Bill Kopp
WHERE: Grail Moviehouse, 17 Foundy Street, Asheville
WHEN: Monday, December 12 @ 4 and 7 p.m. / Tickets are $15