avant-garde Archive

Rehabilitating Herbie, Part 2

Continued from Part One… “In the ‘60s, Herbie Mann wanted to appeal to younger audiences,” observes Cary Ginell, author of several books including The Evolution of Mann: Herbie Mann and the Flute in Jazz. “And the way to do that was through rock ’n’ roll. He always enjoyed challenging his audiences and thumbing his nose

Rehabilitating Herbie, Part 1

Previously-Unheard 1969 Live Tapes from Jazz Flautist and his Band Nominally a jazz musician, flautist Herbie Mann (1930-2003) enjoyed crossover appeal and success that brought his music to a much wider population than simply jazz aficionados. Mann released dozens of albums, and restlessly explored different styles of music. He sold a lot of records, won

Album Mini-review: Matthew Bourne — moogmemory

File next to: Philip Glass, Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark, Brian Eno The Memorymoog was the last synthesizer produced by Moog Music during the original company’s run; while a deeply versatile and expressive instrument, its complex inner workings made it highly unreliable, and that contributed both to the damaging of Moog’s reputation and to the

Album Mini-review: John Cale — M/FANS

File next to: Leonard Cohen, Diamanda Galas, Einstürzende Neubaten John Cale has never been one to trade on his Velvet Underground fame; he’s long since left behind the music of those days. His main instrument these days is keyboard, not cello. On Music for a New Society/M:FANS, he presents a deeply melodic, meditative approach. His

DVD Review: Frank Zappa and the Mothers — The Lost Broadcast

For an artist who seemingly documented nearly every moment of his live and studio performance – and, not unlike John Lennon and Yoko Ono, considered the entirety of it as a single body of work – the early work of Frank Zappa‘s Mothers (of Invention) was, surprisingly, not as extensively captured and saved as one

Album Review: Jaimeo Brown Transcendence — Work Songs

As a music reviewer, I get a lot of albums for potential coverage. A lot. And to manage the flow, I keep a spreadsheet, cataloging those slated for eventual review according to the date I receive them, genre, and a few other details. It makes for handy organization. But occasionally something comes along that brings

Album Mini-review: Homme — Homme

File Next to: KT Tunstall, The Roches, Radiohead With electric guitars (run through a Leslie speaker cabinet and other assorted effects) and close yet vocal-acrobatic harmonies, the experimental yet inviting sonic approach of this Chicago duo suggests an otherworldly combination of Nirvana and The Roches. Just when you think they’re going to be some kind

Album Mini-review: Sunn O))) – Kannon

File next to: Godspeed You! Black Emperor, Earth, Glenn Branca It’s easy to dismiss the pummeling, sludgy, drone-rock of Sunn O))) as noise; even fans of the group might happily admit that noise isn’t an unfair word to describe the group’s music. But behind the dense sonic curtain of their non-tempo music – there’s nothing

Ahleuchatistas’ Arrebato: Wordless Tributes to the DIY Aesthetic

Even in the fertile musical ground of WNC, Asheville isn’t really known as a hotbed of avant-garde musical adventures. But the two-man group Ahleuchatistas are nothing if not sonic explorers. The touring act came home to Asheville for a free-admission show to celebrate their new album release at Mothlight on Friday, November 20. Variously described

Concert Review: Jaga Jazzist — Asheville NC, 23 June 2015

Demonstrating yet again that – more than sixty-odd years after the dawn of rock’n’roll – popular music idioms remain fertile ground for experimentation and cross-fertilization, Jaga Jazzist combines rock, jazz, electronica, trip-hop, and who-knows-what-else into music that is all and none of those things at once. And as their recent show at New Mountain in