prog Archive

Ultimate Trip: Riverside Sets Sight on North America (Part Three)

Continued from Part Two… You mentioned Lunatic Soul. To date, you’ve done a very good job of keeping Lunatic Soul as a separate project distinct from Riverside. Do you ever see a time in which the two might blend into a single project? I don’t think so. Of course, I’m the main composer in Riverside,

Ultimate Trip: Riverside Sets Sight on North America (Part Two)

Continued from Part One… The first three Riverside albums are a trilogy, but recent releases don’t so much have that conceptual continuity. Is the idea of conceptually-linked releases something that you’ve left behind? Reality Dream Trilogy was connected mostly because of the lyrics, mostly because of the Travis Smith [album] covers. And the music, let’s

Ultimate Trip: Riverside Sets Sight on North America (Part One)

Riverside isn’t exactly a household name in the American music scene, but the Polish rock group is on a mission to change that. Founded in 2001, the band balances metal, progressive and ambient approaches with a strong emphasis on melody. The group’s 2003 debut, Out of Myself, didn’t chart, but by the time of 2005’s

Concert Review: The Neal Morse Band, Feb. 11 2019 The Neighborhood Theatre, Charlotte NC

Neal Morse is well established as a key figure in American progressive rock, a field that—certainly as compared to its British and European counterparts—is sparsely populated. But even if there were exponentially more prog artists operating in the U.S., it’s assured that Morse would still be at the top of the heap. Morse first came

Even More Hundred-worders for May 2019

I’m determined to keep my backlog of music-for-review to a manageable size. Making that happen means that once again it’s time for ten of my quickie reviews. So off we go. These are all new or very recent titles of new music. Girls on Grass – Dirty Power I really like this record. Right off

Hundred-worders for May 2019: Vinyl

A subtle hint to any press agents or label reps who might happen to read this: a near surefire way to get your client’s album reviewed on Musoscribe is to send me a vinyl record. Unless I wholly detest it – and that’s not likely to happen if you check in before sending to make

Hundred-worders for May 2019

Here we go again, kids. If you’ve visited Musoscribe before, you likely know the drill: new albums worth your (and my) time, covered in the tidy space of precisely 100 words each. Proper Ornaments – 6 Lenins Here’s a nice one. With shades of Echo & the Bunnymen and the church, this London group makes

Where But for Caravan Would We? A Look Back at Caravan’s debut LP

By 1968, the burgeoning musical underground in England was attracting notice in wider circles. Thanks to the success of ambitious works like the Beatles’ Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, the Moody Blues’ Days of Future Passed, Pink Floyd’s The Piper at the Gates of Dawn and Procol Harum’s debut album (to name but four

Procol Harum’s Salad Days (Are Here Again) Part 2 of 2

Continued from Part One… Novum stands on its own as an excellent album of new material. Can you tell me about the circumstances leading to making the first new Procol Harum album in many, many years? Well, that’s a very nice comment, I must put in there. Thank you very much. Because that is something

Procol Harum’s Salad Days (Are Here Again) Part 1 of 2

Formed in 1967, the sophisticated and forward-looking British band Procol Harum had its origins in a very different outfit, the Paramounts. Along with pianist/singer Gary Brooker, guitarist Robin Trower, multi-instrumentalist Chris Copping and drummer B.J. Wilson were part of a group that focused on American-style rhythm and blues. The band scored a UK Top 40