prog Archive

Album Mini-review: Endless Tapes — Brilliant Waves

File next to: Brian Eno, Lunatic Soul, *Low-era David Bowie Considering the pedigree of the better-known half of this duo, one might expect Brilliant Waves to lean in a muscular and “proggy” direction.” Bassist Colin Edwin is renowned for his work on twenty Porcupine Tree albums, plus many other projects that showcase a harder, musically

Hundred-word Reviews January 2016: Prog

Today I’m serving up five more hundred-word reviews; today’s five all fit more or less into the progressive rock category, and they’re sourced from across this globe of ours. Mekaal Hasan Band – Andholan Talk about genre labels: I have some issues with the term “world music.” While often well-intentioned, it marginalizes most anything outside

Hundred-word Reviews January 2016: Archival Live Albums

It’s time once again to take a stab at clearing out the massive backlog of worthy CDs clogging my inbox. Today, it’s quick reviews of five archival live albums, all previously unreleased. Cheap Trick – Auld Lang Syne By the tail-end of the 1970s (this show was recorded at Los Angeles’ Forum on New Year’s

Album Review: Gentle Giant — Octopus (Steven Wilson Remix)

Progressive rockers Gentle Giant released Octopus, their fourth album, in December 1972. Allowing that Gentle Giant’s music is nothing if not an acquired taste, Octopus is among their best work. The album got a long-awaited CD reissue on the group’s own Alucard label in 2011. That release featured excellent sound along with a booklet containing

Colin Edwin: Progressive in Any Language (Part 2)

Continued from Part One… Add to that challenge the expansiveness of the North American continent; the major markets – New York, Chicago, Los Angeles – are much farther apart than, say, Amsterdam and Berlin. “With Porcupine Tree, we did a lot with a sleeper bus,” Colin Edwin recalls. “But it was expensive. Especially when you

Colin Edwin: Progressive in Any Language (Part 1)

Some years ago in a print feature, I characterized Colin Edwin – then the bass player in Porcupine Tree – as “eternally bemused.” The music of Porcupine Tree is adventurous, aggressive, and melodic, but (it must be said) rarely what one would call…humorous. But through it all, the highly skilled bass guitarist wore an expression

Video Review: Rush — R40 Live

For a good bit longer than three decades now, I’ve been a fan of progressive rock, or “prog,” as it’s called by fans and detractors alike. I enjoy the displays of technical and instrumental prowess within the context of epic-yet-tuneful compositions. But I’m not an uncritical consumer of the genre. Prog is perhaps more prone

Box Set Review: George Duke — The Era Will Prevail (Part Two)

Continued from Part One… Vol. 3: Feel Released in October 1974, Feel again featured bassist John Heard and drummer Ndugu alongside George Duke, but his guest artists lent a decidedly adventurous air to the disc: husband and wife Airto Moreira (the Brazilian percussionist Duke knew well through his association with Julian “Cannonball” Adderley) and Flora

Box Set Review: George Duke — The Era Will Prevail (Part One)

George Duke (1946-2013) was one of the most fascinating figures in music during the second half of the 20th century. Duke was a jazz-and-classically trained musician proficient on any number of instruments, though he is best known as a keyboard player. He got his start collaborating with French virtuoso violinist Jean-Luc Ponty, and his early

Concert Review: Papadosio w/ Third Nature and Midnight Snack, October 31 2015

A concert scheduled on October 31 gives those in a playful, partying mood an excellent excuse to head out to the show. While the ensuing sold-out crowd at Asheville’s Orange Peel didn’t end up creating a favorable atmosphere for the two opening acts on the bill, headliner Papadosio was the beneficiary of an upbeat and