prog Archive

Steve Hackett Revisited, Part 3

Continued from Part Two… Bill Kopp: You’ve acknowledged that the early 1970s Genesis catalog was not very commercially successful in its day. But it’s so highly regarded now. Why do you think that is the case? What do you think is the source of the enduring appeal of that Genesis music? Steve Hackett: The albums

Steve Hackett Revisited, Part 2

Continued from Part One… Bill Kopp: Do you think that quality among the three of them – early on – was a key to them staying together long after you and Peter had left the group? Steve Hackett: I think so, but it’s getting on 20 years now that that power trio did anything creatively

Steve Hackett Revisited, Part 1

Steve Hackett is best known as the lead guitarist in Genesis from 1970 to 1977. He embarked on a solo career while still in that group, releasing his first album, Voyage of the Acolyte in 1975. Since that time he has continued to work as a solo artist, in collaboration with others and (briefly in

Plankeye Peggy’s Album Release Carnival

Editor’s Note: the album release carnival discussed in this feature has already taken place; check out Plankeye Peggy’s other live dates here. “We don’t want people concentrating on how many key changes we go through, the whole prog rock thing,” says Dave Gilbert, guitarist in Asheville, North Carolina-based Plankeye Peggy. “That’s not really the crowd

Hundred-word Reviews for February 2016, Part 1

Once again, it’s time for some hundred-word reviews. This first set spotlights five archival releases loosely falling into the prog subgenre. Greg Lake & Geoff Downes – Ride the Tiger We head pretty far into the prog-rock weeds for this one. Greg Lake (guitar, bass) of ELP got together with Geoff Downes (Buggles, Yes, Asia)

Album Mini-review: Steven Wilson — 4 1/2

File Next to: Radiohead, Opeth, Peter Gabriel Steven Wilson is possibly the busiest musician of the 21st century. Beyond his leadership of the now on-hiatus Porcupine Tree, he’s recorded and/or toured as (or as part of) Blackfield, No-man, Bass Communion, Storm Corrosion, and I.E.M. His remix work has improved on the already superb back catalogs of

Album Review: Game Theory — Lolita Nation

I know people who are way-into the rock subgenre known as power pop. I’m one of those people myself, and I make no apologies for it. And while most aficionados of the style acknowledge the debt owed to earlier pioneers such as Badfinger, The Raspberries and a select few others from that era, the mention

Album Review: Yuka & Chronoship — The 3rd Planetary Chronicles

Progressive rock has a widespread (and, it must be said, often well-earned) reputation for being ponderous, pompous, overblown, and more about showy technical and instrumental brilliance than emotional content. Not to paint with too broad a brush, but that reputation might explain why the overwhelming majority of prog rock audiences are male (just attend most

Album Mini-review: Endless Tapes — Brilliant Waves

File next to: Brian Eno, Lunatic Soul, *Low-era David Bowie Considering the pedigree of the better-known half of this duo, one might expect Brilliant Waves to lean in a muscular and “proggy” direction.” Bassist Colin Edwin is renowned for his work on twenty Porcupine Tree albums, plus many other projects that showcase a harder, musically

Hundred-word Reviews January 2016: Prog

Today I’m serving up five more hundred-word reviews; today’s five all fit more or less into the progressive rock category, and they’re sourced from across this globe of ours. Mekaal Hasan Band – Andholan Talk about genre labels: I have some issues with the term “world music.” While often well-intentioned, it marginalizes most anything outside