prog Archive

Hundred-word Reviews: New Releases

There’s quite a massive stack of new (or at least new-when-I got-’em) releases here at Musoscribe World HQ. Time to review them. 6-String Drag – Top of the World (Schoolkids Records) This Raleigh-based group was at the forefront of the Americana scene, back when it didn’t even have a name (some called it alt-country). After

Hundred-word Reviews: Reissues, Archival Releases, Compilations

My shelf full of albums to be reviewed has run out of space. So once again it’s time for a raft of hundred-word reviews. All sixteen titles in this roundup are reissues, compilations and/or archival releases. 6-String Drag – High Hat (Schoolkids Records) Before Americana was coined as a genre, there was alt-country. Combining rock

Marillion: To Prog or Not to Prog? (Part Two)

Continued from Part One… And while for many, the whole idea of progressive rock means (somewhat paradoxically) looking back, Marillion has long been on the forward edge of one of music’s important modern-day developments: connecting with fans via the internet. Marillion was among the first musical acts to realize the power of developing contact lists

Marillion: To Prog or Not to Prog? (Part One)

The heyday of progressive rock was the period 1971 to 1976; while suggestions that punk “killed” the genre are wishful thinking on the part of prog’s detractors, it’s true that the genre fell somewhat out of fashion as the 1970s played out. But prog never really went away; it simply mutated, developed and combined with

The Wiard World of Cary Grace (Part Two)

Continued from Part One… Grace describes Wiard products as “boutique, made-to-order units. Somebody will get in touch with me and let me know what modules they want, and put down a deposit,” she says. “And then—or at the point where I clear whatever I’m working on—I’ll start building. Every single single solder connection is made

The Wiard World of Cary Grace (Part One)

Cary Grace has followed a winding and unlikely path to arrive at her current situation. Born and raised in the American south, she’s currently living the the United Kingdom. And though her musical career started out in the Nashville singer-songwriter scene, today she makes progressive rock albums. Grace also owns and operates Wiard, a boutique

Album Review: Staring Into Nothing – Power

Pop-leaning, dramatic progressive rock is the order of the day on Power. Staring Into Nothing is merely a trio, but they manage a big sound. The three musicians – vocalists/keyboardist Steve Rogers, guitarist Savannah Rogers and bassist Kurt Barabas – clearly have ambitious plans in place. Power is the first in what looks ot be

2017’s Top Ten You Might Not Have Heard/Heard Of

My brow furrows a bit when I read “Best of” lists published in November or early December; are December releases set aside for consideration in the following year? Or are they ignored? A look at albums released in the last month of 1967, for example, includes Jimi Hendrix’s Axis: Bold as Love, Traffic’s Mr. Fantasy,

Album Review: Jason Vitelli — Head Above Tide

Vitelli’s crystalline, classically-inflected piano style and clear voice give the music on Head Above Tide a regal, refined feel that may remind some of Neal Morse-era Spock’s Beard crossed with early Billy Joel. There’s a deliberately dry production aesthetic to the songs that conveys a kind of immediacy; listeners will feel as if they’re right

Album Review: Galena — Tropic of Prancer

Progressive rock is often and wrongly though of as a man’s game. There’s a long-standing cliché that paints both the artists and audiences as black t-shirt-wearing white males. But in fact the comparatively highbrow rock subgenre has a long and proud tradition of female involvement. Though her métier leaned more toward jazz, iconic 1960s vocalist