vinyl Archive

Album Review: Spygenius – Man on the Sea

One observation made about The Beatles when they hit America is that they sang without thick Liverpudlian (Scouse) accents; they keys to their success were clearly myriad, but that may have been one of them. It was only when groups like The Kinks (to name one) began to achieve some success that the deep Britishness

Album Review: Jimmy Sweeney — Without You

Another in the (happily and) seemingly endless stream of unearthed gems, Jimmy Sweeney’s Without You is a collection of songs by a singer who was all but unknown. His claim to fame lies in a story – possibly apocryphal but leaning toward being true – about a demo he sent to Sam Phillips. That disc

Album Review: Nat Turner Rebellion – Laugh to Keep From Crying

I’ve written of similar observations before; here I am doing it once again. It amazes me to no end that so many years after the fact, never-before-heard recordings surface, and the quality of the music is remarkable. So it is with Nat Turner Rebellion’s Laugh to Keep From Crying. Recorded in various sessions between 1969

Outrageous: The Mind Excursions of Dennis Coffey (Part Two)

A look back at the renowned guitarist’s Sussex Records years Continued from Part One … Goin’ for Myself (1972) On its initial release, Evolution didn’t sell. “The album was out there,” Coffey recalls, “but for a year, it did nothing. So, Mike and I said, ‘Well, maybe the people aren’t interested in the guitar band

Outrageous: The Mind Excursions of Dennis Coffey (Part One)

A look back at the renowned guitarist’s Sussex Records years Dennis Coffey made his name among musicians as an in-demand session guitarist in Detroit. Coffey played on literally hundreds of sessions; that’s him you hear laying down the memorable guitar parts on the Temptations’ “Psychedelic Shack” and “Just My Imagination,” Edwin Starr’s “War,” Freda Payne’s

Album Review: Bonniwell Music Machine

There’s an esteemed list of albums from the 1960s that didn’t get their due the first time around; the era was so rich with gems that plenty of great albums slipped by the public’s notice. For every Pet Sounds, Revolver and Days of Future Passed there’s an obscurity that – while it may not have

Album Review: Marvin Gaye — More Trouble

I’ve read critical essays that characterize Marvin Gaye’s Trouble Man as part of a triptych of albums, one of three soundtrack albums for ‘70s “blaxpliotation” films. Yet against the backdrop of Isaac Hayes’ Shaft and Curtis Mayfield’s Super Fly, Gaye’s 1972 album is little known and less remembered. Part of the reason for that may

Album Review: Nancy Priddy — You’ve Come This Way Before

In 1967, a young singer named Nancy Lee Priddy was part of a group of musicians assembled to assist in the making of Songs of Leonard Cohen, the debut release by the Canadian songwriter, poet and novelist. Priddy provided backing vocals on three of the album’s tracks, “Hey, That’s No Way to Say Goodbye,” “So

Album Review: Seiche — Demo Press

By the dawn of the 1980s, progressive rock was decidedly out of fashion. Neither mainstream radio – which never really embraced the genre, save for free-form FM stations – nor the record-buying public showed much interest in the knotty, ambitious and cerebral sounds that a few years earlier had flourished on the music landscape. The

Album Review: Peter Laughner

Chances are good that you’ve never heard of Peter Laughner. And if you’re immediately replying, “Oh, yes I have!” then chances are good that you know of him via his time with Rocket from the Tombs. RFTT was one of those seminal acts whose influence far outstripped beyond their popularity, sort of like a less-well-known