vinyl Archive

Doug McKechnie’s ‘San Francisco Moog: 1968-1972’

In the late ’60s, the Moog modular synthesizer was still very much an experimental tool. While there had been some ambitious attempts to use the Moog as the centerpiece of recordings — Mort Garson’s 1967 LP The Zodiac: Cosmic Sounds was likely the first album to feature the synthesizer prominently — “serious” use of the

Album Review: The Rocky Horror Picture Show (soundtrack)

Even though today I’m (cough, cough) middle-aged, when The Rocky Horror Picture Show first came out, I was too young to appreciate it. In fact, as an 11-year-old, I was too young to have appreciated it, even if my parents had allowed me exposure to the film (and they would not have done). But its

Chocolate Samurai: More from My Conversation with Fantastic Negrito (Part Two)

Continued from Part One … Police violence and racial disparity have been in the news a whole lot more in recent times than they had been in a long time. Do you think things are actually getting worse or are people just starting to get fed up and it’s starting to get reported on more?

Chocolate Samurai: More from My Conversation with Fantastic Negrito (Part One)

Thanks to my friend and former bandmate Jeff Japp, I discovered the music of Fantastic Negrito right around the time he released his stunning – and eventually Grammy-winning – debut, The Last Days of Oakland. I’ve also been lucky enough to see him live onstage no less than three times, and I’ve had at least

Fantastic Negrito: ‘These are My Friends’

This feature appeared previously in SF Weekly — bk When Xavier Dphrepaulezz reinvented himself as Fantastic Negrito, his self-described “black roots music for everyone” struck a chord with the listening public. While he had released an album in the ‘90s as Xavier, the life-changing aftermath of a serious auto accident in 1999 led to his

Guide for the Turtles Fan: An Album-by-album Discussion with Mark Volman (Part 3 of 3)

Continued from Part Two … Turtle Soup (originally released October 1969) For their fifth album, The Turtles made a highly unconventional choice in producer: they called on British musician Ray Davies, best known as leader and songwriter of The Kinks. Prior to working on Turtle Soup, Davies had never produced another artist. But Volman is

Guide for the Turtles Fan: An Album-by-album Discussion with Mark Volman (Part 2 of 3)

Continued from Part One … Happy Together (originally released April 1967) Only four of the 11 songs on Happy Together would be written by group members, but once again, superb taste in choosing material yielded the band’s finest release to date. Years before he made a name for himself as a recording artist, Warren Zevon

Guide for the Turtles Fan: An Album-by-album Discussion with Mark Volman (Part 1 of 3)

What we need in the world today is a Guide for the Turtles Fan lead a guided tour through their six LPs as only Mark Volman can … baa … ba ba baa … Founders, co-leaders and co-vocalists of The Turtles, Howard Kaylan and Mark Volman are equally revered for their music as they are

Album Review: Nick Mason’s Saucerful of Secrets — Live at the Roundhouse

In the 21st century, it’s not a bit unusual for well-known and celebrated music artists to tour o nthe strength of material they recorded and released a half century ago. As fine as 2019’s Who might be as an album, few bought concert tickets with a goal of hearing material from it, Endless Wire or

Album Review: Parish Hall — s/t

One of the longest lists that exists is the one noting recordings that were overlooked because there was simply too much good music already happening. It’s a delight – especially for a listener who enjoys musical styles whose time has (officially, any way) come and gone – to discover a long lost, previously unheard gem