vinyl Archive

Real People, Great Radio (Part 2)

Continued from Part One… Community perspective on community radio Volunteer-driven and nonprofit, AshevilleFM was launched to offer a non-commercial, community-focused listening option for Asheville radio listeners. The station’s mission statement emphasizes its goal of “keep[ing] thriving by producing diverse and eclectic programming that inspires our listeners to build connections across our communities and to discover

Real People, Great Radio (Part 1)

AshevilleFM curates all-local project spotlighting Asheville music When the internet developed to the point at which it could support high quality audio and video, pundits prognosticated the imminent death of terrestrial radio. But in the same way that streaming music hasn’t spelled the end of vinyl records, FM radio remains a creative medium, and a

Album Review: Eric Slick – Palisades

A former student (alongside his sister Julie Slick) at the Paul Green School of Rock Music, Eric Slick was catapulted to well-deserved fame when Adrian Belew chose him and Julie to work as his rhythm section in the Adrian Belew Power Trio in the mid- to late 2000s. From there, Eric joined Dr. Dog as

Album Review: The Krayolas — Happy Go Lucky

If the Smithereens were from Texas instead of New Jersey – and if they built on their Beatles influences not by exploring an affinity for Black Sabbath but instead for the Sir Douglas Quintet – then they might sound a bit like The Krayolas. With a chirpy demeanor, jangling guitars and peppy hand claps, The

Single Review: Creedence Clearwater Revival – “Travelin’ Band” Live

This one deserves a bit of background. In 1970 Creedence Clearwater Revival was on top of the world, and deservedly so. The quartet from El Cerrito, California had amassed an impressive run of hit singles; at least eight had charted between 1968 and ‘69. And while founding member and rhythm guitarist Tom Fogerty would leave

EP Review: DB Edmunds — Life’s Wild Ride

Standing in contrast to the prevailing alternarock grunge of the 1990s was a comparatively tiny coterie of artists who valued melody along with rock’s power. Bands like Greenberry Woods, Sugar, Material Issue and Ben Folds Five and solo artists like Michael Penn and Matthew Sweet may not have sounded at all like each other, but

Album review: Azymuth – Telecommunication

It may be difficult to imagine such a thing today, some five decades after the fact, but in the early 1970s, jazz/funk/fusion was more than a blip on the commercial landscape of the music industry. Though jazz would – sadly, and in short order – soon morph into the dreaded “smooth jazz” of artists like

Album Review: Tamar Berk — The Restless Dreams of Youth

Way back in the heyday of rock and pop, artists who scored a record deal were required to churn out a new collection of songs every few months. That furious pace of output separated the wheat from the chaff; not everyone was prolific. Some were up to the task, and we remember their names today.

Album Review: Ellen Starski — Sara’s Half Finished Love Affair

Tuneful, heartfelt and impeccably arranged singer-songwriter fare is the stock in trade of Ellen Starski. On the Nashville artist’s latest release, Sara’s Half-Finished Love Affair, she presents a varied set of songs. Rising above the singer-with-an-acoustic milieu, Starski draws deftly from glitchy 90s’ alt rock (Suzanne Vega’s 99.9F° seems a useful reference point), Americana (the

Randall Bramblett: Lucky That Way

The music business has a built-in tendency to categorize artists: they’re a rocker, a country act, a jazz cat, a rapper or something else. And in those relatively rare instances when an artist ventures even slightly outside of his or her appointed lane, they earn the crossover-artist tag. Yet there do exist a few extra-special