review Archive

Album Review: Dave Brubeck Trio – Live from Vienna 1967

The latest in posthumous recordings courtesy of the Brubeck Editions series, Live from Vienna 1967 is a thrilling, you-are-there live recording featuring the pianist and superb sidemen Joe Morello on drums and upright bassist Eugene Wright. It’s worth noting that the November 12, 1967 performance at the Konzerthaus in Vienna, Austria wasn’t supposed to feature

Album Review: Jeannie C. Riley — Harper Valley P.T.A.

I’ve gone on about this idea before, but it never ceases to fascinate me, so I’ll mention it again. Those of us of a certain age — boomers, I guess you’d say – came of age in an era that was characterized in part at least by shared experience. Where popular culture was concerned, pretty

Album Review: Detective — s/t

By the mid 1970s, having one’s own boutique record label was a symbol of Having Arrived. The Beatles started it all with Apple, and within a few years, The Moody Blues had Threshold, Deep Purple had (naturally) Purple Records, and The Rolling Stones had their own eponymous label. So it came as little surprise when

DVD Review: SVT – The Price of Sex

SVT is one of the coolest bands you’ve likely never heard of. Led by singer, songwriter and guitarist Brian Marnell, this San Francisco-based band had talent to burn, combining musical muscle with sharp songwriting. But the group didn’t last long, and their recorded output was limited to a couple of singles, and EP and one

Album Review: Amanda Anne Platt and the Honeycutters — The Devil and the Deep Blue Sea

By now, gentle reader, you’re likely tiring of reading stories of the making of new albums that spend a lot of time focusing on just how much the pandemic affected things. Musicians were sidelined from a significant part of their livelihood (i.e. playing live), they were forced into isolation… yada yada. So were all of

Album Review: Various — Always Memphis Rock and Roll

For me, the Black & Wyatt Records label is a trademark of quality. Since its launch in 2018, the Memphis label has sought to bring interesting and outside-the-box music to the wider public. And it’s been quite successful on that score: I’ve covered a number of Black & Wyatt releases here on Musoscribe, including titles

Album Review: Son House — Forever on My Mind

An acclaimed Delta blues singer and guitarist, Son House earned significant praise during his lifetime. His work was chronicled on a series of 78 rpm records, on recordings made both for the U.S. Library of Congress and Fisk University, and on more than 20 albums released during his lifetime. His slide guitar work on his

Album Review: Scott McCarl — Play On

I am sure we can agree as to the wonderfulness that is The Raspberries’ catalog. “Go All the Way” is pop perfection, taking the “don’t bore us; get to the chorus” aesthetic to the extreme in its quest for rock’n’roll transcendence. And though they released only four albums in their ‘70s run, what a great

Album Review: The Mommyheads — Swiss Army Knife

The Mommyheads released their debut album Acorn in 1989. A wholebuncha albums followed; the prolific Brooklyn-based group would release four more albums before going inactive in the late ‘90s. When they returned around 2008, their reissues and new albums created a large catalog. These days the band seems to alternate between new and archival reissues,

Album Review: Tony Hazzard — Demonstration

An absolutely delightful if somewhat perplexing collection, Demonstration features thirteen song by Tony Hazzard. The Liverpool-born singer, songwriter and guitarist is best known as a composer; his songs have been recorded by Manfred Mann, the Yardbirds and other sixties British bands. One of Hazzard’s most popular tunes, “Ha! Ha! Said the Clown” was covered twice: