instrumental Archive

Ozric Tentacles: Thirty Years and Still Underground

Ozric Tentacles is that rare group that appeals to fans of trance/rave, techno, jam, psychedelic, and space/progressive rock. Founded in Somerset, England – they currently make their home in Colorado – the festival favorites brought their music indoors to Asheville’s Altamont Theatre on Thursday, October 8. The Ozrics (as they’re known among fans) have been

Patrick Moraz: MAPping Out the Future, Part Two

Continued from Part One… Bill Kopp: Speaking of Moog, the K2000 dates from the period when Dr. R.A. (Bob) Moog was doing work for Kurzweil; he actually created many of the sounds for the K2000. Patrick Moraz: Even farther back – in 1975, forty years ago! – I had recorded the backing tracks for The

Patrick Moraz: MAPping Out the Future, Part One

Quick: name a famous Swiss rock musician. Okay, a few of you might be able to name-check Celtic Frost, Brainticket, or Yello. But for those who aren’t hopeless music nerds, there’s pretty much only one answer: Patrick Moraz. The keyboard virtuoso first came to fame – in the rock idiom, anyway – as a member

Concert Review: Jaga Jazzist — Asheville NC, 23 June 2015

Demonstrating yet again that – more than sixty-odd years after the dawn of rock’n’roll – popular music idioms remain fertile ground for experimentation and cross-fertilization, Jaga Jazzist combines rock, jazz, electronica, trip-hop, and who-knows-what-else into music that is all and none of those things at once. And as their recent show at New Mountain in

Album Mini-review: Jaga Jazzist — Starfire

File Next to: Dungen, Zero 7 With their fifth album, 2010’s One-Armed Bandit, Jaga Jazzist seemed to have distilled their multifarious sound into a cohesive synthesis of downtempo, trip-hop, electronica, and experimental jazz; their approach suggested a cross between Zero 7 and Dungen. They followed that studio album with a live set, 2013’s Live with

Album Review: Thelonious Monk — The Complete Riverside Recordings

In my final year of college, I was exceedingly fortunate to have signed up for a course called American Popular Music History: Stephen Foster to the Present. There were only six of us in the class, and our professor was one Murray Silver; he had just co-authored Myra Lewis‘ book, Great Balls of Fire. But

Album Review: Buddy Rich — Birdland

There has lately developed a trend of dubious merit. Some legitimate (that is, for-profit) record labels have begun releasing what can only be called bootlegs. Tapes – often recorded by audience members on inexpensive amateur equipment – of live performances are now finding their way into the commercial marketplace. And I say this as an

Album Review: Wes Montgomery — The Classic Recordings 1958-1960

The world’s a much smaller place today than it was a quarter century ago. When I frequented record stores – even once the CD era began – import albums were pricey. They simply weren’t in the budget of the average music consumer in the United States. Things are very different now, thanks in no small

David Torn: The Audience is Here (Part 2)

Continued from Part One… “So,” continues guitarist-composer David Torn, “I don’t intend to recreate any of the pieces on only sky in live performance. However, I can accurately recreate the process. Because,” he laughs, “I’m really good at over-intellectualizing anything I do, after the fact. But inside the fact, all I’m really doing…is playing.” “When

David Torn: The Audience is Here (Part 1)

As I would discover within the first moments of our conversation, it’s inaccurate to describe the music made by David Torn as “avant garde.” Which is fine, really, because as the ever-quotable John Lennon once said, “’Avant garde’ is French for ‘bullshit.’” And he would know. That does leave the challenge of describing Torn’s music,