soul Archive

The New Mastersounds Schedule Residency at Brooklyn Bowl

Dynamic funk/jazz fusion quartet The New Mastersounds recently came to Brooklyn Bowl for a three-day, four-show residency April 14-16. The group, founded in 1999 in Leeds, England, has been doing an extended series of shows in Brooklyn annually for awhile now, says guitarist Eddie Roberts. “We’ve been playing at the Brooklyn Bowl for years. We

Blues Vocalist Janiva Magness Opens Up on ‘Love Wins Again’

Though award-winning blues vocalist Janiva Magness has recorded a dozen albums to date (her latest, Love Wins Again, was released April 8), she came to songwriting long after her career began. “I did not want to be a writer,” she says. “It made me nervous; I didn’t like the idea. I wanted that idea to

Album Mini-review: Charles Bradley — Changes

File next to: James Brown, Sharon Jones & the Dap-kings, Eli Paperboy Reed On Charles Bradley‘s third full length, the “screaming eagle of soul” shows himself to be a fascinating interpreter of diverse material, as evidenced in his soulful reading of Black Sabbath‘s “Changes.” Bradley mines a sense of pathos that Ozzy’s vocal merely hinted

Rehabilitating Herbie, Part 2

Continued from Part One… “In the ‘60s, Herbie Mann wanted to appeal to younger audiences,” observes Cary Ginell, author of several books including The Evolution of Mann: Herbie Mann and the Flute in Jazz. “And the way to do that was through rock ’n’ roll. He always enjoyed challenging his audiences and thumbing his nose

Rehabilitating Herbie, Part 1

Previously-Unheard 1969 Live Tapes from Jazz Flautist and his Band Nominally a jazz musician, flautist Herbie Mann (1930-2003) enjoyed crossover appeal and success that brought his music to a much wider population than simply jazz aficionados. Mann released dozens of albums, and restlessly explored different styles of music. He sold a lot of records, won

Album Mini-review: Dr. Lonnie Smith — Evolution

File next to: Jimmy Smith, Jimmy McGriff, Shirley Scott The title might be taken as a hint that the music’s going somewhere it hasn’t been before, but that’s not really the case with Evolution, the 24th long player from the esteemed soul-jazz organist and early associate of guitarist George Benson. And the honorific Dr. Lonnie

Album Review: Blowfly — 77 Rusty Trombones

Warning: this review may not be suitable for readers under the age of, I dunno, let’s say…twenty-one. And the subject of the review – Blowfly‘s final album, 77 Rusty Trombones – well, it’s certainly not what one would call family entertainment. Blowfly was the alter-ego of Clarence Henry Reid, an accomplished singer, songwriter and musician.

Hundred-word Reviews January 2016: Compilations

This week-long run of quick reviews wraps up today with looks at five excellent compilation albums. King Curtis – The Complete Atco Singles Real Gone Music swings for the fences with this, a three-CD set that collects all of the saxophonist’s 64 a- and b-sides released on the Atlantic subsidiary (plus two unreleased tracks). Randy

Hundred-word Reviews January 2016: Archival Live Albums

It’s time once again to take a stab at clearing out the massive backlog of worthy CDs clogging my inbox. Today, it’s quick reviews of five archival live albums, all previously unreleased. Cheap Trick – Auld Lang Syne By the tail-end of the 1970s (this show was recorded at Los Angeles’ Forum on New Year’s

Album Review: Love — Reel to Real

In the community of pop music critics and historians, it’s common to find Love‘s Forever Changes cited as one of the great lost albums of the 1960s. Under-recognized at the time of its release, Forever Changes has in recent years taken its rightful place among musical treasures of its era. There it joins The Beach