soul Archive

Things Get Better: Soul Man Eddie Floyd (Part 1 of 3)

On the occasion of the publishing of his memoir, Knock! Knock! Knock! On Wood: My Life in Soul, I spoke at length with soul legend Eddie Floyd. The feature based on that conversation – first appearing in Record Collector – follows. – bk Between 1966 and 1974, soul singer Eddie Floyd scored an impressive number

Hundred-word Reviews: February 2021, Part 3

These five are all archival, reissue and/or compilation releases. There’s even a vinyl release here. Wolfgang Lackerschmid & Chet Baker – Quintet Sessions 1979 I was only recently introduced to the sublime collaborative genius of Lackerschmid and Baker via this release. Now, from the same era, comes this archival release. It’s even better, featuring as

Album Review: Little Richard — The Rill Thing

By the end of the 1960s, it was reasonable to assume that Little Richard’s rock ‘n’ roll career was moribund. Though he was one of music’s most important figures, by 1958 he had forsaken secular music in favor of gospel. And while he would return to rock in the ‘60s, too often he and his

30 Days Out, January 2021 #1: Chuck Brodsky, Hustle Souls, Arcadian Wild, Derek McCoy Trio

Happy New Year! Even in normal times – a phrase that most certainly doesn’t apply to present day – the post-holidays winter months are the “secret season” in Asheville and its environs. The tourists (who are both an economic engine for the region and the bane of many local residents’ existence) largely stay away for

Album Review: Chicago Soul Jazz Collective – It Takes a Spark to Start a Fire

On their first recording, the Chicago Soul Jazz Collective tackled a collection of familiar genre standards, and the results were impressive. For their newest release, however, the group applies its skills to seven original tunes, all from the pen of tenor saxophonist John Fournier. Among the defining characteristics of the soul jazz subgenre are strong,

Album Review: The Whit Boyd Combo — Party Girls OST

Admittedly, it requires a certain kind of sense of humor to appreciate such a thing, but as fate would have it, I’m just such a person. So as out-there as the context might be, I now count myself as a fan of what has been (somewhat arbitrarily) dubbed the Whit Boyd Combo. As the liner

Hundred-word Reviews for November 2020, Part Three

And here’s the last of this current run of hundred-word reviews covering new releases. Soul, powerpop and blues; something for most tastes. All worth your time. Sonny Green – Found! One Soul Singer Don’t let the cheesy, lurid, chartreuse album art dissuade you from the contents: this is the real deal. Sonny Green is one

The Appeal of Fresh ‘Fwuit’

Dulci Ellenberger and her musical associates have been something of a moving target lately. For several years, the Asheville-based singer-songwriter-guitarist fronted Holy Ghost Tent Revival, the seven-person, ragtime-jazz-meets-rock band. That same lineup (which included bassist Kevin Williams and drummer Ross Montsinger) also booked shows under the name Big Sound Harbor, playing a set built around

30 Day Out, November 2020 #1: JJ Grey & Mofro, Russ Wilson, Empire Strikes Brass, Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band

Is it November already? How did that happen? Things aren’t much better with regard to the pandemic, but we’re all continuing to find our way forward with regard to things like live music. The four artists covered below – two local to Asheville, two actually on tour – have found ways to bring live music

Album Review: The Greyboy Allstars — Como De Allstars

The Greyboy Allstars released their debut, West Coast Boogaloo, in 1994. That album, a collaboration with the great Fred Wesley, was reissued on vinyl this year. Now – more than a quarter century later, a period that included a seven-plus year break for the soul jazz ensemble – they return with their sixth album, Como