prog Archive

August Capsule Reviews

Here’s another in my occasional series of quick cuts. This time ’round I’m covering recent releases by names who’ve been around the block a few times. These are people whose work you’ll know (or will recall once I remind you) but who perhaps haven’t had a high profile of late. My self-imposed limit for each

Album Review: Caravan — Recorded Live in Concert at Metropolis Studios, London

Even when I was a kid, I’d read the liner notes of the LPs I’d buy. And I’d look at the printed inner sleeves when they were included. It was via those four-color sleeves for Moody Blues albums (on the London label) that I first heard of artists such as Danny O’Keefe, Savoy Brown, Ten

Album Review: Volto! — Incitare

In the related and sometimes overlapping fields of marketing and customer service, “bait and switch” is – quite rightly – considered a bad thing. Drawing a potential customer in with promises of one thing only to deliver another (or worse yet, a sales pitch for another) is considered an unethical practice. But somehow when it’s

Album Review: Spock’s Beard – Brief Nocturnes and Dreamless Sleep

Less dedicated bands would have called it a day and gone home by now. But the guys in California-based progressive rock outfit Spock’s Beard seemingly have no intention of waving the white flag of surrender, and for that, fans should be grateful. The band was formed in 1992 by brothers Alan and Neal Morse (guitar

Stick Man for Stick Men: The Pat Mastelotto Interview, Part 2

Continued from Part One… BK: This is an oversimplification, but bear with me. In rock, the drums pretty much keep the beat. In jazz, the beat is often implied. In progressive rock of the sort you do with Stick Men, your role seems to be somewhere in between, and the drums take on a role

Stick Man for Stick Men: The Pat Mastelotto Interview, Part 1

Though his major-label introduction to the rock world was as drummer for Mr. Mister, Pat Mastelotto’s résumé would subsequently include a staggering list of credits in a dizzying array of different projects. His work with King Crimson – as part of the renowned “double trio” configuration (on and off since around 1995) is perhaps his

Album Review: Nektar – Time Machine

In 2013, there aren’t all that many bands making progressive rock of the sort that walked the Earth in the first half of the 1970s. But while the popular thinking is that punk killed off prog, that simply didn’t happen: it merely went back to being a slightly underground movement – as did punk, really

July Capsule Reviews, #2 of 3

Here are four more capsule reviews that fulfill my twin goal of (a) clearing off my desk and (b) getting the word out about some music you’d almost certainly otherwise miss. Today’s selections are of a progressive bent. As is my standard procedure, my self-imposed limit for this particular exercise is 150 words on each

Album Review: Live Kraut: Live Rock Explosions from the Heyday of Krautrock!

I discovered this internet thing about nineteen years ago. Ever since then – more so once I became Editor in Chief for a now-defunct print magazine, and even more so in the last four years since I launched this blogzine – I have connected with all manner of new and wonderful people. I’ve made friends

Album Review: Various Artists – The Dutch Woodstock (CD+DVD)

I’m a hardcore Pink Floyd fanatic. Yeah, one of those lot who insists that the stuff they did before The Dark Side of the Moon is filled with untold riches. The sort who (allegedly) has over 200 lossless audio documents of Floyd concerts, some dating back to the Syd Barrett era (though you can’t hear