rawk Archive

Album Review: Sorrows – Love Too Late…the real album

Here’s a record with a helluva story. After making an excellent melodic rock album in 1980’s Teeenage Heartbreak, Sorrows (no “the”) went to England to record their second LP with expat producer Shel Talmy producing. Apparently no one involved was happy with the results, and the resulting release, Love Too Late, sank without a trace.

EP Review: Lynx Deluxe — Jungleland

Here’s something different. Lynx Deluxe’s Jungleland is a five-song EP that builds its sound around heavy beats. Not the electronic kind, though; this is no hip-hip or electro endeavor. Real drums, played forcefully and with a keen balance between complexity and sheer power, form the basis of these tunes. The songs themselves are hooky rockers,

Album Review: Sour Ops — X

Say it loud: power pop and proud! Readers of this online music magazine will know that while I approach it with guarded optimism, I do like me some power pop. They’ll also agree that the term is oft-abused, so much so that quite a few artists who might fit into the category instead abhor the

Flights Are Back on Schedule for Travers Brothership

Brothers Kyle and Eric Travers launched their band, Travers Brothership, nearly a decade ago in Black Mountain. After a few years of honing their approach, they recorded and released their debut album, A Way to Survive, in 2016. That same year the rock/jam/blues band won the title of “#1 Alternative Band in WNC” in the

30 Days Out, October 2021 #1: Jimbo Mathus, Rocky Horror Show, Buddy Guy, Tennis

Americana that’s more than twang. Classic camp. A blues legend. Retro-pop. Those are four of the highlights on the Asheville music calendar these coming 30 days. Artist: Jimbo Mathus Venue: The Grey Eagle (patio) Date: Friday, Oct. 8, 6 p.m. Door: $15 If you only know Jimbo Mathus from his role as leader of Squirrel

Album Review: Nektar – …Sounds Like Swiss

Nektar was one of those bands that got lost in a sea of great music. Though they were British, being based in Germany certainly didn’t help gain them exposure in places like the U.S. So despite the high quality of their music – especially on albums like 1971’s Journey to the Center of the Eye,

Rodrigo y Gabriela Take on Jazz, Metal and the Future

Though their music is rooted in acoustic flamenco guitar, Mexico City-based instrumental duo Rodrigo y Gabriela are open to – and draw from – the entirety of popular and traditional music. Across more than two decades, six studio albums, three live releases, three EPs and countless live dates across the globe, Rodrigo Sánchez and Gabriela

Album Review: The Mommyheads — Age of Isolation

The Mommyheads aren’t widely known outside of New York City (and Sweden), and that’s a shame. With wit that sometimes rivals that of XTC, a melodic sense that recalls 10cc and a prolific nature (more than a dozen albums released, even while taking a decade-long hiatus), The Mommyheads are one of pop music’s undiscovered gems.

Album Review: Jim Basnight and The Moberlys – Seattle – New York – Los Angeles

Describing something as underrated is sometimes little more than a lazy way of approaching an artist’s work. But it can have useful meaning. In the case of The Moberlys, the group could well be described that way. But the label doesn’t quite get to the heart of the matter: how can you be underrated if

Album Review: Steve Barton – Love & Destruction

Steve Barton is best known as one of two guitarists and songwriters in Translator, the San Francisco band that gave us “Everywhere That I’m Not.” But while the band went semi-dormant a number of years ago, Barton remains active as a solo artist. His latest release is Love & Destruction. Like his earlier records, it