indie Archive

Album Review: Brother Reverend — The Tables Turn Too Often

I think the publicist – however well-meaning he may be – was having a bit of fun when writing the one-sheet that accompanies promo copies of The Tables Turn Too Often. Sure, it’s useful to provide potential reviewers with some musical signposts, occasionally dropping of names in a RIYL (“promo-speak for “review if you like…”)

Album Review: Taylor James — Insane

For me, the use of numbers and capital letters in place of, y’know, actual words is a red flag: it was kinda dumb when Prince did it, and it’s wholly unoriginal now, a generation later. So the discovery of the opening track “Back 2 U” caused me to lower my expectations in regard to finding

EP Review: Poet Radio – Horseflesh

On the band’s website, Asheville-based Poet Radio describes itself as “a dark psych rock band with occultist undertones.” New listeners shouldn’t be warned off by that description; the trio’s new Horseflesh EP starts off accessibly enough and gets more even listenable as it goes along. “I’m Clean” begins abruptly, almost as if the band had

Hundred-word Reviews for August 2018, Part 1

Time for some more hundred-word reviews. These days, I’m busier than I’ve ever been, so the only albums to make the cut for review are ones I consider remarkable, special in some significant way. So please consider all of these as recommended titles. Oytun Ersan — Fusiolicious When a release explicitly advertises itself as fusion,

Album Review: Ben Delaurentis — Liar for a Muse

After making a trio of band albums, Lynchburg, Virginia singer-guitarist Ben Delaurentis has made a solo record in Liar for a Muse. But don’t assume that you’ll find a vice-and-acoustic vibe; Delaurentis has a pleasing sense for arrangement, and he makes the best of instrumentation and (especially) vocals. “As Good as it Gets” opens the

Album Review: American Amnesia — …Yet Here We Are

The band name and the album title might suggest to some that this is an album of sociopolitical commentary. Not so much: this Connecticut trio makes hard-charging rock. The songs often have more than one good idea in ‘em. To wit: the opening track, “Time,” sounds like two completely different songs grated together. One’s fairly

Sloan: A Question of Balance

Canadian rock foursome Sloan is unusual in the context of popular music: the band has been together for more than 25 years without a single change in its lineup. Even more remarkably, all four members of the Toronto-based group sing, play multiple instruments and compose songs. And it’s no leap of logic to observe that

David Wilcox: Local Hero

David Wilcox didn’t start his life in Western North Carolina, but once the singer-songwriter discovered the region, he knew he had found his home. Thirty-seven years and twenty-plus albums later, Asheville remains Wilcox’s home, and living here informs his music in myriad ways. In celebration of the release of The View from the Edge, his

Album Review: Ajay Mathur – Little Boat

In the years just before punk broke in the UK, there was a musical scene bubbling under that would exert an influence on punk while (quietly) providing a bridge between mainstream rock and its more jagged variant. Like garage rock and freakbeat, the scene didn’t really have a name in wide use at the time;

EP Review: Arden and the Wolves – Who Can You Trust

If one digs deep into the music on Arden and the Wolves’ Who Can You Trust, a clear occult undercurrent reveals itself. That’s certainly a somewhat unconventional perspective to take, but the fact is that most everything else about this five-song EP released in January 2018 is quite accessible and (in a good way) mainstream