Progress Report #4: My Book About 415 Records

It’s time for another of my occasional book updates. I’m mere days away from finishing writing my second book, Disturbing the Peace: 415 Records and the Rise of New Wave. As I tackle the remaining few chapters, I’m struck (as I have been throughout the project) by the ways in which various themes come up

Same Roots, Separate Sounds

New exhibit highlights Gospel’s role in our region’s music In 2020, the Tryon (North Carolina) Fine Arts Center launched its Illuminations Through Music and Heritage exhibit, shining a light on the region’s diverse musicians. The program is funded in part through the Communities Connecting Heritage grant administered by World Learning and the U.S. Department of

Hendersonville Symphony, Up Close and Personal

This feature appeared previously in Bold Life Magazine. Just over a year ago, the Hendersonville Symphony Orchestra launched a new program aimed at expanding its audience. The orchestra’s Director of Marketing and Special Events, Paul Conroy, explained at the time that the goal of its “HSO Presents” concert series was to “broaden our musical footprint.”

That Time Was Then…and Now Again

The dB’s are one of my favorite groups. So I was delighted when I recently learned that a digital-only album that Chris Stamey and Peter Holsapple released last year during the pan-youknowwhat would be released on physical format. That album, Our Back Pages, is available on CD starting today. I reviewed it last year. Go

Home is Where the Synths Are: Sunset Lines Reinvents, Again

From arena-hopping festival headliners to the local garage band, COVID-19 forced musicians of all stripes to rethink, reorganize, and regroup. Fortunately for Liz Brooks and Paul McCorkle, the core duo behind Bay Area synth-pop project Sunset Lines, by the time the pandemic shuttered venues across the country they were already accustomed to starting over. The

Album Review: Jem Records Celebrates Brian Wilson

Here we go again. I’ve long held that various-artists tribute albums are by definition uneven. Some acts try to take the songs too far from their essence, stripping the songs of whatever made them special and noteworthy to begin with. Others are too slavish by half, effectively adding nothing to the discussion, making what amounts

30 Days Out, June 2021 #2: Supatight, Min Xiao-Fen, Love Bubble, Dots

Welcome back to the world, friends. I have some exciting musical news to share. I’m happy to say that the four shows spotlighted below are merely a slice of your live music options in Asheville, N.C. over the next thirty days. And while there are plenty of options, these four come with the Musoscribe seal

Musoscribe at 12

This month marks the 12-year anniversary of this here Musoscribe site. I’ve been writing much longer than that, but I started archiving/posting my work online in June 2009. It seems like a lifetime ago. As I’m currently consumed with finishing my second book, I’d like to pause a beat and take the opportunity to glance

The JackTown Ramblers: Blue Notes and Bluegrass

To most listeners, the musical connection between jazz manouche (also known as “gypsy jazz”) and Appalachian bluegrass isn’t immediately obvious. But Western North Carolina sextet The JackTown Ramblers explore the region on the Venn Diagram where those styles intersect. The members of the group are well positioned to understand and explain the relationship between those

Vagabond Crowe: Balancing Roots and a New Direction

Hendersonville, N.C. band Vagabond Crowe began as an alternative American/folk band, and recently recorded and released its debut album, Fortune Teller. But as co-leader, songwriter Mitch Stewart explains, creativity often means change, and today the group looks and sounds different from before. Your website says that the songs on Fortune Teller were “written in the