The Supersuckers: F-bombs and Devil Horns

Michael Jackson anointed himself King of Pop, so it’s no surprise that other artists would engage in similar hubris. After touring and recording for a few years, the Supersuckers branded themselves as The Greatest Rock and Roll Band in the World. And who’s to argue? Their mix of raw rock ‘n’ roll (bordering on punk)

The Nighthawks: From Acoustic to Full-on Electric Onslaught

Since their start in 1972, journeyman blues outfit The Nighthawks have been faithfully doing their part to keep the blues alive. Though the lineup has changed – only founder-leader Mark Wenner remains from the original group – the Washington, D.C.-based quartet has consistently breathed fresh life into the uniquely American musical form. Joined by vocalist

Devils in Dust: The Hazards of Hi-Fi

After years of local and regional success with groups of their own, Corey Bullman and Leigh Glass have now combined their musical projects into a single one, Devils in Dust. Along the way, they also fell in love and got married. When faced with the chicken-or-egg question – which came first: the musical relationship or

Jamie Laval’s Celtic Christmas

For several years now, Celtic fiddler Jamie Laval has crafted a special December program for audiences. Bringing together music, dance and storytelling, Laval presents “Celtic Christmas,” a family-friendly performance that showcases not only Christmas traditions, but observances of older pagan rituals centered around winter solstice. Laval’s late December performance calendar included a show in Asheville

Paul Vo: The Inventor and His Thousand Elves

“If you tap on something and you get a tone, there’s music hidden in there. And I have the technology that could bring it out.” So says Paul Vo, an Asheville-based inventor who applies technology to expand the range of traditional, acoustic instruments. Vo’s latest invention is the Vo-96, a low-profile device that attaches to

Jonathan Scales, Man of Steel

Spontaneity is a highly valued commodity in the jazz world. And Jonathan Scales has that quality in great supply. He brought that just-in-time approach to competing in a national search for musicians to serve as cultural ambassadors for an international concert tour in 2017. And in December, he toured with a collective of esteemed musicians

A Look Back at ELP with Carl Palmer, Part Three

Continued from Part Two … Bill Kopp: With the benefit of studio technology, bands in the early ’70s could overdub and make really dense, layered albums. Reproducing that sound onstage was another matter, especially for a three-piece, I would imagine … Carl Palmer: Of course we didn’t have MIDI in those days, so we couldn’t

A Look Back at ELP with Carl Palmer, Part Two

Continued from Part One … Bill Kopp: The term “supergroup” was just coming into use around the time ELP got started. And it certainly applied to you three, since each of you had achieved success in previous projects. I would imagine there were expectations placed upon you by the music press and so forth. Did

A Look Back at ELP with Carl Palmer, Part One

Late-breaking Author’s Note: Very shortly after I turned in this feature for publication — it ran in December on BLURT — news broke that Greg Lake had succumbed to cancer at age 69. Carl Palmer and I didn’t spend a lot of time discussing Greg specifically, but Carl did, as you’ll see, make repeated references

Album Mini-review: The Legal Matters — Conrad

File next to: Wings, Lannie Flowers Power pop is the Rodney Dangerfield of the rock world: it gets no respect. Detractors call it shamelessly derivative and lightweight. Those who have a soft spot for the subgenre, on the other hand, appreciate the chiming, sticky-sweet melodies and sharp hooks. Michigan’s the Legal Matters – a trio