Eliot Sumner: Sounds Familar

When singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Eliot Sumner began her recording career, she used the name I Blame Coco for her project. That choice was based at least in part upon her desire not to trade on her famous name. As the daughter of bassist Gordon Sumner (that’s Sting to you and me) and actor Trudy

Concert Review: Dungen — 9 June 2016, Asheville NC

It had been nearly five years since Swedish “folkrockpsych” band (their description) Dungen last played in Asheville. On that September 2010 date, the four-piece was touring in support of their seventh album, Skit I allt. In the ensuing years, Dungen went quiet, fueling speculation that they had disbanded. Guitarist Reine Fiske had already started another

Lake Street Dive: Right Place, Right Time

“We just used the ‘throwing darts at the internet’ method for getting our music out there,” says Rachael Price, lead vocalist of Boston-based foursome Lake Street Dive. Their low-budget video of the group covering The Jackson Five‘s “I Want You Back” became a viral sensation in 2013; to date the clip has gotten more than

Album Mini-review: Brian Eno — The Ship

File next to: Pink Floyd, Tangerine Dream, Low-era David Bowie Though he came to prominence initially as a member of art-rockers Roxy Music (and then, years later, as an in-demand producer), Brian Eno’s specialty has long been ambient music. His groundbreaking 1970s albums (Discreet Music, Music for Airports, etc.) established the style, and since then,

Album Mini-review: Those Pretty Wrongs

File next to: Starling Electric; Teenage Fanclub, The Posies Jody Stephens was the George Harrison of legendary Memphis power pop group Big Star: though these days Chris Bell and Alex Chilton get the lion’s share of credit for the transcendent melodies they served up on #1 Record and Radio City, Stephens’ contributions are too often

Colvin & Earle: Embracing Spontaneity

Though they both have thriving and creatively satisfying musical careers of their own, singer/songwriter/musicians Steve Earle and Shawn Colvin recently decided to work together on an album; Colvin & Earle will be released June 10. The longtime friends have also scheduled a tour in support of the album: kicking off June 4 in Pueblo, the

Hundred-word Reviews for June 2016, Part 5

Today wraps up my week-long series of posts featuring short reviews of noteworthy new releases. These last five are jazz. Dig. Dan Pratt – Hymn for the Happy Man Pratt plays alto and tenor sax, backed by a piano/bass/drums ensemble; bassist Christian McBride is the most high-profile member of the group. The set is varied,

Hundred-word Reviews for June 2016, Part 4

And now for some jazz reviews. Brian Bromberg – Full Circle Bromberg has recorded at least 12 albums prior to Full Circle. The disc opens with a rare archival recording made some 65 years ago; it features his drummer father with a trumpeter and trombonist. Bromberg has added his bass to the recording; it’s delightful.

Hundred-word Reviews for June 2016, Part 3

Still more of these quickie reviews. Today’s theme is melodic rock (some call it powerpop; you decide). Michael Carpenter – The Big Radio The liner notes for this set will disappoint: it may well be Carpenter’s last album; to paraphrase, he seems to feel that his head will feel better when he stops banging it

Hundred-word Reviews for June 2016, Part 2

Five more quick reviews. Some great stuff here. Today’s five all fall pretty neatly into the progressive rock category. Security Project – Live 1 Tribute acts can be a dodgy affair, especially when the subject of said tribute still performs. But these guys are truly legit. One, Peter Gabriel no longer performs his early solo