new release Archive

Elvin Bishop and Charlie Musselwhite: Birds of a Feather Make Blues Together

This feature appeared previously in SF Weekly. The musical careers of Elvin Bishop and Charlie Musselwhite have followed similar paths. Both were raised in America’s heartland: Bishop in Iowa, Musselwhite in Tennessee. Both white musicians developed a deep and abiding love for the blues, eventually relocating to Chicago. After establishing themselves as formidable players –

Book Review: That Thin Wild Mercury Sound: Dylan, Nashville, and the Making of Blonde on Blonde

One of the most confounding and inscrutable of all artists, Bob Dylan and his body of work defy simple descriptions. Of course that hasn’t stopped journalists, academics and critics from trying. There’s no telling how many books and articles have been written about Bob Dylan and his music. But if a dedicated and thoughtful writer-researcher

Album Review: Circuline — Circulive: New View

For whatever reason, my own tastes with regard to progressive rock lean heavily toward music coming out of the UK. Given the choice between, say, Genesis and Kansas, I’ll always opt for the British group. There are occasional exceptions: the work of Spock’s Beard – especially the Nick D’Virgilio era – is some amazing stuff.

Album Review: The Greyboy Allstars — Como De Allstars

The Greyboy Allstars released their debut, West Coast Boogaloo, in 1994. That album, a collaboration with the great Fred Wesley, was reissued on vinyl this year. Now – more than a quarter century later, a period that included a seven-plus year break for the soul jazz ensemble – they return with their sixth album, Como

Modern Strangers: Self-made Men

Infectious tunes like the speedy pop of Modern Strangers’ “Where’s Your Man” – the speedy pop gem that’s the leadoff single from Modern Strangers’ debut album, Dangerous Fiction – combine rock grittiness and the sleek, streamlined vibe of classic pop. Listeners yearning for weepy, introspective balladry are advised to look elsewhere; this band is all

Album Review: Days Between Stations — Giants

Though he’s not credited as such, Billy Sherwood’s extensive role in the making of Days Between Stations’ Giants should earn him membership in the group. Officially, DBS is Oscar Fuentes Bils and Sepand Samzadeh, but Sherwood is co-credited as arranger, producer and composer. Instead, he’s listed as a “guest artist,” alongside bassist Colin Moulding (of

Album Review: The Mommyheads — New Kings of Pop

The cover art for The Mommyheads’ New Kings of Pop immediately calls to mind Kraftwerk and DEVO. But in keeping with the title, what this New York City band has on its collective mind is far more tuneful and conventional. Which isn’t to suggest that the music lacks adventurousness. Intelligent, thoughtful lyrics are supported by

Book Review: Steve Hackett — A Genesis in My Bed

As a longtime fan of early Genesis and the solo work of Steve Hackett – as well as having interviewed Hackett on no less than three occasions and seen him live onstage as well – I simply couldn’t pass up the opportunity to read his autobiography/memoir, A Genesis in My Bed. It would be a

Album Review: Nick Mason’s Saucerful of Secrets — Live at the Roundhouse

In the 21st century, it’s not a bit unusual for well-known and celebrated music artists to tour o nthe strength of material they recorded and released a half century ago. As fine as 2019’s Who might be as an album, few bought concert tickets with a goal of hearing material from it, Endless Wire or

Album Review: The Black Watch – Fromthing Somethat

It’s difficult to keep up with the steady stream of output from The Black Watch. Just last year the group led by John Andrew Fredrick released a pair of albums – the 31 Years of Obscurity compilation and the all new Magic Johnson. Those were followed in short order by Brilliant Failures, reviewed in April.