new release Archive

Doug McKechnie’s ‘San Francisco Moog: 1968-1972’

In the late ’60s, the Moog modular synthesizer was still very much an experimental tool. While there had been some ambitious attempts to use the Moog as the centerpiece of recordings — Mort Garson’s 1967 LP The Zodiac: Cosmic Sounds was likely the first album to feature the synthesizer prominently — “serious” use of the

Hundred-word Reviews for November 2020, Part Three

And here’s the last of this current run of hundred-word reviews covering new releases. Soul, powerpop and blues; something for most tastes. All worth your time. Sonny Green – Found! One Soul Singer Don’t let the cheesy, lurid, chartreuse album art dissuade you from the contents: this is the real deal. Sonny Green is one

Hundred-word Reviews for November 2020, Part Two

Here’s five more quick reviews. Powerpop, ambient, jazz and more. Nick Frater – Fast & Loose The title might lead the uninitiated to suspect that Nick Frater’s album is something along the lines of the Stooges. Well, it’s not. Instead, it’s melodic, tuneful and highly appealing rock that has the best elements of subgenres (classic-,

It’s Still About Chemistry: A Conversation with Semisonic’s Jacob Slichter

In my last feature, I shared bonus content from my interview with Semisonic’s Dan Wilson. That piece featured parts of our conversation that didn’t make it into the story I wrote for Goldmine Magazine. Today it’s more bonus content: the best bits from my conversation with Semisonic drummer (and keyboardist) Jacob Slichter. – bk Your

Lightning Strikes Again: A Conversation with Semisonic’s Dan Wilson (Part Two)

Continued from Part One … Bill Kopp: One thing that has always surprised me is the way in which Semisonic – and this was true for Trip Shakespeare as well – got lots and lots of critical acclaim, but you didn’t really explode into the superstar commercial realm. I certainly thought you should have. Do

Lightning Strikes Again: A Conversation with Semisonic’s Dan Wilson (Part One)

This summer I spoke with Dan Wilson and Jacob Slichter of Semisonic about the band and its new EP, You’re Not Alone. (Vacationing with his family at that time, bassist John Munson was unavailable, so I missed the opportunity to follow up with him on our 2015 conversation.) Large bits of our conversations are featured

Re-opening Time: Semisonic Returns with a new EP (Part Two)

Continued from Part One … When listeners hear new songs like the soaring title track and the riffing “Basement Tapes,” they may find themselves thinking that Semisonic has picked up right where it left off in 2001. And that idea hung over Wilson and his bandmates as they contemplated the group’s reactivation. Wilson says that

Re-opening Time: Semisonic Returns with a new EP (Part One)

An edited version of this feature appeared previously in Goldmine Magazine. Minneapolis rock trio Semisonic scored big with “Closing Time,” the hit single from their second album, Feeling Strangely Fine. The song – and all of Semisonic’s music – may have been out of step with the prevailing grunge scene, but listeners across the globe

Hundred-word Reviews for November 2020, Part One

Today marks the triumphant return of my hundred-word reviews. My last roundup of new releases in the form of brief critical summaries came way back in February, before the world changed. For awhile there, the steady stream of new releases seemed to slow to a trickle; many planned releases were – quite understandably – put

The Appeal of Fresh ‘Fwuit’

Dulci Ellenberger and her musical associates have been something of a moving target lately. For several years, the Asheville-based singer-songwriter-guitarist fronted Holy Ghost Tent Revival, the seven-person, ragtime-jazz-meets-rock band. That same lineup (which included bassist Kevin Williams and drummer Ross Montsinger) also booked shows under the name Big Sound Harbor, playing a set built around