new release Archive

New Albums from Larry, Tracey and Murali Coryell

There was a time in the late 1960s and early ’70s when it looked as if Larry Coryell would break out as the Next Big Thing. A fiendishly gifted guitarist with a deep interest in (and more importantly, a thorough mastery of) many different styles of music, he was and remains quite prolific. Whether as

Album Mini-review: Mike Watt — “Ring Spiel” Tour ’95

File next to: Meat Puppets, Mission of Burma, Sugar Gravelly-voiced bassist Watt first made his name as the bassist in The Minutemen, and after that group’s end in the wake of D. Boon‘s untimely death, with Firehose. Eventually he embarked on a solo career; his first solo tour – in support of 1995’s Ball-Hog or

Album Review: Seven Simons — Post

Athens, Georgia was fertile musical ground in the 1980s. Looking beyond the biggest names – R.E.M., the B-52s, Pylon and (briefly) Matthew Sweet – one could discover a vibrant music scene. Some of it was chronicled in Tony Gayton‘s 1987 documentary, Athens, GA: Inside/Out. But even that film didn’t cover all the worthy music coming

Album Mini-review: TimLee3 — Tin, Man

File next to: The Blasters, X, Long Ryders TimLee3 is the band started by former Windbreakers guitarist and his bass-playing wife, Susan Bauer Lee. Last year’s 33-1/3 was another excellent twangified take on power pop, and the trio’s fifth album Tin, Man is every bit as good. But simultaneous with the release of this 11-track

Album Mini-review: Pink Floyd — The Early Years, 1967-1972, Cre/ation

File next to: Genesis, Led Zeppelin, Yes Unless one is both the hardest of hardcore Pink Floyd fan and wealthy, The Early Years Box Set probably isn’t under consideration (it retails for more then $500). But for those with an interest in the band that goes beyond their best-selling albums, this new 2CD set is

Shonen Knife: Sharp as Ever

The Japanese have long had an odd fascination for specific bits of Western pop culture. Even if confining the discussion to pop music, there are myriad examples. The 1960s garage rock movement in the US gave way to Japan’s own homegrown variant, the so-called GS (“group sounds”) movement. A Japanese answer to ’80s “hair metal”

The Struts: Second Time’s the Charm

In July 2014, the Struts released their debut album. With arena-sized melodic hooks and a lead singer who bore more than a passing vocal resemblance to Freddie Mercury, Everybody Wants seemed like a likely hit on the UK charts. But the record wasn’t a hit, rising only to #52. Undaunted, the Struts tinkered with the

Kyle Travers’ Brothership Connection

Twin brothers Kyle and Eric Travers have been making music together since they were young. In 2012 the Black Mountain, NC residents put together a seven-piece band, Travers Brothership, initially as a vehicle for the original songs they were writing. After some reorganization and re-thinking of their direction, the band finally recorded and released their

Devils in Dust: The Hazards of Hi-Fi

After years of local and regional success with groups of their own, Corey Bullman and Leigh Glass have now combined their musical projects into a single one, Devils in Dust. Along the way, they also fell in love and got married. When faced with the chicken-or-egg question – which came first: the musical relationship or

Album Mini-review: The Legal Matters — Conrad

File next to: Wings, Lannie Flowers Power pop is the Rodney Dangerfield of the rock world: it gets no respect. Detractors call it shamelessly derivative and lightweight. Those who have a soft spot for the subgenre, on the other hand, appreciate the chiming, sticky-sweet melodies and sharp hooks. Michigan’s the Legal Matters – a trio