new release Archive

Album Review: Eleventyseven — Basic Glitches

What a difference a couple of decades can make. Eleventyseven got its start in Laurens, S.C. as a pop-punk band trafficking in Christian themes; one of its earliest shows took place when founding members Matt Langston and Caleb Satterfield were still in high school; that show was at a rally in support of sexual abstinence.

Seratones: Power Takes Time

In the music business there’s something known as the “difficult second album.” Some call it a sophomore slump, arising from the idea that the artist has his or her entire life to write songs for the first record, and then mere months to craft material for a follow-up. It’s the rare artist that sidesteps this

Keller Williams: Prolific at any ‘Speed’

A multigenre, multi-instrumental artist, Keller Williams makes music that appeals to a wide array of music fans. Steeped in Americana, he makes music that proudly displays the influence of bluegrass and folk. And his improvisational prowess has gained him a serious following in the jam band community. Williams performs live in many different contexts, as

Album Review: Louis Armstrong and His All Stars — Live in 1956

Though he had certainly been massively popular before, in the middle 1950s jazz trumpeter and vocalist Louis Armstrong was near the top of his game. In 1947 he broke up his big band and formed a new group, the All Stars made up primarily of former leaders of other bands. Louis Armstrong and His All

Bartender-Author Sandlin Gaither on Tequila, Dog Hair and Chainsaw Fights

Note: This story first appeared in Mountain Xpress ahead of the live performance referenced herein. Sandlin Gaither has been listening to you and your friends. From his position behind the bar at popular local music venues in Asheville, N.C., he’s been witness to some memorable conversations. Without causing a delay in the serving of beer,

Pat Travers is Still Right in the Swing of Things

Pat Travers was part of a wave of late ’70s guitar heroes, artists who – in the wake of Peter Frampton’s runaway success – seemed poised to break out in a major way. But just as that started to happen, a combination of changing fashions, corporatization of rock radio and just plain bad luck blunted

Hundred-word Reviews for January 2020

Every so often – pretty often, in fact – I find a stack of CDs has accumulated on my desk. They’ve made the cut as albums deemed worthy of sharing with my readers. In the space of just one hundred words, I endeavor to convey what’s noteworthy or even special about these releases. Each of

Album Review: LLGLDNBKS — ‘self-titled album’

In 1988, R.E.M. released an album titled Eponymous. The compilation – a survey of the band’s years on IRS Records, released after the band had decamped for Warner Brothers – bore a title that served as a gentle poke-in-the-ribs of sorts to music journalists. It has long been common practice for writers covering music releases

Moby Grape’s Peter Lewis: A Rock ‘n’ roll Survivor on ‘The Road to Zion’ (Part Two)

Continued from Part One… Peter Lewis’ problems at the time weren’t nearly as severe as those facing Spence, who famously came at band mates Miller and Stevenson with a fire axe. Mosley suffered a breakdown of sorts as well in 1969, abruptly quitting the band and enlisting in the Marines (he was diagnosed as a

Moby Grape’s Peter Lewis: A Rock ‘n’ roll Survivor on ‘The Road to Zion’ (Part One)

Ask a hardcore rock music fanatic to name the most underrated band of the 1960s, and the answer you’re most likely to get is this: “Moby Grape.” Though sometimes credited as an early example of country rock, Moby Grape could rock as hard as any San Francisco band. And the came up with catchy, single-worthy