pop Archive

Always Finish What You Started: Van Dyke Parks on ‘Orange Crate Art’ (Part 3 of 3)

Continued from Part Two… Parks recalls a visit to a friend in rural Virginia, nearly 2500 miles due East from southern California. “I went past, Galax, where the Old Fiddlers Convention is held,” Parks remembers. “It inspired me to write ‘My Jeanine,’ [set] in a place that doesn’t exist and a time I haven’t forgotten.”

Always Finish What You Started: Van Dyke Parks on ‘Orange Crate Art’ (Part 2 of 3)

Continued from Part One… Parks recalls how the germ of the project came about in or around 1990. “I had a piano exercise, and it was fun for me,” he says. “Because I am a pianist, most of my songs derive from the keyboard.” Seeking a name for the exercise, he came up with “Orange

Always Finish What You Started: Van Dyke Parks on ‘Orange Crate Art’ (Part 1 of 3)

Though he never sought the role – nor does he wear it comfortably – Van Dyke Parks is something of a cult figure in music. An idiosyncratic musical storyteller of all he surveys, remembers and imagines, Parks filters his ideas through a distinctly American sensibility, one that exists resolutely outside of the rock and pop

30 Days Out, March 2021 #1: Chelsea Lovitt, Aditi and Jay, TV Girl, The Jakob’s Ferry Stragglers

Live music is coming back! Who knew? To be sure, it’s not everywhere, and when it’s indoors it’s subject to social distancing protocols – we’re not out of the woods just yet – so if you’ve had your shots, mask up and go go go support the return of live music. Three of these four

Album Review: Tenant From Zero — Flight

With a sound halfway between late-period Roxy Music and ‘90s triphop/chillwave/downtempo a la Massive Attack and Zero 7, Brooklyn-based Tenant From Zero makes moody, hauntingly romantic music for the ages. The arrangements on Flight are nicely balanced between spare and lush aesthetics. Buttery fretless bass lines, shimmering keyboard textures, subtle, understated percussion and the soulful

Album Reviews: Big Stir Singles — The Seventh and Eighth Waves

Time was, Jordan Oakes reigned as the tastemaker supreme in the powerpop world. His Yellow Pills compilation series shone a light on the very best that the genre had to offer. And the four volumes in the series – all quite expensive today if you can even find them (you can’t have mine) – hammered

Album Review: Phil “Fang” Volk — Rocker

Phil “Fang” Volk is best known as bassist for Paul Revere and the Raiders during their most high-profile era, roughly 1965-67. That’s him – the long-running group’s fourth in succession of bassists – you hear playing bass on essential cuts like “Steppin’ Out,” “Kicks,” the original version of “(I’m Not Your) Steppin’ Stone,” “Good Thing,”

Hundred-word Reviews: January 2021 #2

Here’s five more brief reviews; this time we’ve got progressive rock, powerpop, indie chamber pop, goth rock and one album that’s simply beyond easy classification. What they all have in common is that they’re new, they’re indie, they’d be likely to escape your notice if you didn’t visit Musoscribe, and they’re all quite, quite good.

Kevin Godley: The Consequences of Remote Collaboration (Part 2 of 2)

Continued from Part One… Submissions took the form of rough instrumental audio mixes. Each time Godley came across one with potential, he took things to the next step. “If I liked it, I’d just pull it on to GarageBand [digital audio workstation software], and sing over the top of it, straight into a computer.” That

Kevin Godley: The Consequences of Remote Collaboration (Part 1 of 2)

In 2020, working remotely is commonplace. Even before circumstances required it, many people found that working from home could be just as efficient as showing up to a formal workplace. Creatives and musicians, of course, have known this for longer than most. Elton John and Bernie Taupin famously collaborated by mail for years, putting words