blues Archive

Here Comes Charlie Musselwhite!

Renowned blues harp (or harmonica, if you like) player Charlie Musselwhite was born in Mississippi, raised in Memphis, and headed to Chicago to follow the blues. His landmark 1966 LP Stand Back! Here Comes Charley [sic] Musselwhite’s Southside Band is an exemplar of the powerful Chicago blues style. He has won 14 Blues Music Awards,

30 Days Out, October 2020 #2: Pretty Little Goat, Natti Love Joys, Marcus King Trio, Jane Kramer

Welp … looks like we’re back to live, in-person concerts. After a fashion, that is. All of the shows spotlighted in this edition of “30 Days Out” are socially-distanced in one manner or another. One’s a drive-in show (concertgoers stay in or near their vehicle). Another is an outdoor lawn concert. Another is in a

Album Review: Parish Hall — s/t

One of the longest lists that exists is the one noting recordings that were overlooked because there was simply too much good music already happening. It’s a delight – especially for a listener who enjoys musical styles whose time has (officially, any way) come and gone – to discover a long lost, previously unheard gem

Adi the Monk: The ‘Cosmic Thread” Running Though His Music

Asheville’s music community features an impressive number of unique personalities. But it’s safe to say that only one has a personal history that includes a period spent as a Vaishnava monk. Ādi Puruṣa Das performs and records as Adi the Monk, making instrumental music that – on the surface at least – has little to

Album Review: Franck L. Goldwasser – Sweet Little Black Spider

The 1980s were not a rich era for the blues. But the decade wasn’t without highlights. Artists like Joe Louis Walker and Arthur Adams were prominent on the scene. And older artists like Jimmy “Fast Fingers” Dawkins and Charlie Musselwhite were still wowing audiences and cutting records. And French-born guitarist Franck L. Goldwasser (then known

Album Review: King Solomon Hicks – Harlem

Opening with Leon Russell’s “I’d Rather Be Blind” underscores the point that King Solomon Hicks is no blues purist. His reading of the song – first cut by Freddie King in 1972 on his Russell-produced Texas Cannonball – owes a debt to the kind of blues played by the Mad Dogs and Englishmen aggregation. And

Album Review: Big Bill Broonzy — The Midnight Special

Big Bill Broonzy’s musical influence is incalculable. And even though he recorded prolifically, a new archival release is an important addition to his body of work. A solo acoustic performance, Midnight Special: Live in Nottingham 1957 showcases Broonzy’s myriad assets. Foremost among those are his fine and expressive voice, his peerless selection of material, his

30 Days Out, July 2020 #1: Blake Ellege Band, Rocky MTN Roller, Life Like Water, Mr. Jimmy

Once again it’s time for a look at live music events in and around Asheville in the coming 30 days. And for the first time since early March (and those mostly ended up canceled) there are some actual live-and-in-person performances to spotlight. That said, caveats apply. (1) Will these shows actually happen? Who knows!? Best

Never Giving Up on the Blues: Lil’ Ed & the Blues Imperials

Lil’ Ed Williams is Chicago blues royalty. Nephew of Blues Hall of Famer J.B. Hutto, Williams launched a band of his own, Li’ Ed and the Blues Imperials, in the mid 1970s. A fine electric slide player, Williams knew how to put on a show. He fronted a band that Alligator Records founder Bruce Iglauer

Album Review: Phast Phreddie and Thee Precisions — Limbo

As the seemingly endless parade of retrospective compilations – Nuggets, Pebbles, Green Crystal Ties, Picadilly Sunshine and on and on – has made plain, the mid to late ‘60s were filled with more worthwhile music than any one person could possibly listen to, much less assimilate. But as it turns out, that fact is true