prog Archive

Album Review: Conspiracy – Conspiracy Live

As the sole member of Yes to appear on every single album, Chris Squire has stayed quite busy these last several decades. Though he released but one solo album (1975’s Fish Out of Water), Squire has found time for quite a number of projects outside Yes. One of these is a band called Conspiracy, a

Album Review: Curved Air – Airwaves

Not to take anything away from the impressive achievements of The Police (their dubious 21st century reunion notwithstanding), but it’s long been a source of some amusement among rock historians to point out the band’s pedigree. Though they were (and remain) darlings of the so-called new wave movement of the late 1970s and early 80s,

Album Review: Nektar – Journey to the Centre of the Eye

The history of 1970s rock is littered with also-rans. Even though the pop music landscape of that decade was arguably more varied than today’s (and by “pop” I mean music that could be easily found and heard by the average consumer), the marketplace was dominated by some high-profile acts. And the success of those artists

Album Review: King Crimson – Discipline (40th Anniversary Series Edition)

From their inception in 1969, King Crimson has always been about creating outside-the-box music that challenges (or simply ignores) convention. By the middle of the 1970s, the band had created at least two masterpieces: their debut album In the Court of the Crimson King and 1975’s Red. But after Red – when King Crimson was

Album Review: Unitopia – Covered Mirror Vol. 1: Smooth as Silk

Like any musical genre or subgenre, progressive rock has many varieties within its confines. There’s aggressive, sometimes atonal math-based stuff; there’s brutal prog-metal, there’s retro-prog that tries to recreate the sound and/or vibe of the classic stuff from the 70s. And there’s a melodic, accessible flavor, the kind that makes the charts, albeit rarely. Its

Album Review: Rick Wakeman – No Earthly Connection

I had my initial doubts about this one, and with good reason. Among music fans, Rick Wakeman is a polarizing figure. One either loves his work or despises it. For those in the former camp, his keyboard playing, composing and arranging show a deft, assured and endlessly creative master. Both as a highly in-demand sessioner

A Conversation with Thijs Van Leer of Focus

American audiences know Focus – if they know the Dutch progressive group at all – for their left-field 1971 hit single “Hocus Pocus.” Yeah, the one with the yodeling, whistling, accordion and hard-rocking guitar. But the group’s career started before that (in the late 60s, actually) and continues to this day, albeit with some lineup

Capsule Reviews: January 2013, Part 4

Here’s still another installment in my occasional series of capsule reviews; today I cover rock, prog, industrial/EDM and…you decide. I had a huge stack of CDs deserving of review, but time doesn’t allow for full-length reviews of everything, and these were beginning to gather dust. They deserve better. My self-imposed limit for this particular exercise

Capsule Reviews: January 2013, Part 3

Here’s another installment in my occasional series of capsule reviews; today it’s prog, ambient, worldbeat and acoustic. I had a huge stack of CDs deserving of review, but time doesn’t allow for full-length reviews of everything, and these were beginning to gather dust. They deserve better. My self-imposed limit for this particular exercise is 150

Capsule Reviews: January 2013, Part Two

Here’s another installment in my occasional series of capsule reviews, this time covering new releases by indie/self-released artists. My self-imposed limit for this particular exercise is 150 words on each album. War Poets – Dulce et Decorum Est Every so often an act comes along that is – or at least seems to be –