electronica Archive

30 Days Out, September 2021 #2: Schizophonics , Side Pony, Dirty Logic, Thievery Corporation

Lots of cool choices for live music in and around Asheville in the coming thirty days. By now, you know the drill: Most venues are requiring proof of vaccination or results of a legit test within 72 hours prior to entrance. These venues want to stay in business, and they want their patrons to stay

30 Days Out, July 2021 #1: Black Joe Lewis, Women of Synthpop, Japanese Breakfast, Songwriters in the Round

Touring artists are getting back into the swing of things. That means that this roundup of live music in Asheville features two national acts. The other two spotlighted shows each present three local artists. A nice mix here of singer-songwriter, electronica, blues and modern pop. And though Ididn’t plain it this way, of the eight

Oklawaha Synth Community: Bringing the Weird

Open-mic music nights are fairly common at the bars and breweries in Western North Carolina. But responding to the challenges brought on by the pandemic, some enterprising musicians took the regular event in a new direction. A little weird and a lot intriguing, the Oklawaha Synthesizer Club (formerly the Hendo Synthesizer Community) isn’t just for

Hundred-word Reviews: January 2021 #1

Welcome to 2021. Let’s hope it’s better for the world’s citizens than 2020 was. Some things, at least, never change. And one of those is my commitment to covering music that might otherwise escape readers’ notice. My hundred-world review entries are an attempt to do just that. Here are five new releases you should know

30 Days Out, December 2020: Doom Flamingo, Unspoken Tradition, John Doyle, Mike Cooley

Live music is decidedly back, with restrictions. All of these shows – happening in the next 30 days in Asheville – feature limited seating and other restrictions, but they represent some of the best (and only) opportunities to witness live music. Two of the featured acts are Asheville-based; two are national acts doing some very

Rad Lab: Doug McKechnie and the Moog Model III (Part Three)

Continued from Part Two … You’ve said – only half joking, I’d guess — that the main goal of the San Francisco Radical Lab was attracting women. Well, it wasn’t much more than that. And I came up with the name “San Francisco Radical Laboratories.” At the time, one of the things that I was

Rad Lab: Doug McKechnie and the Moog Model III (Part Two)

Continued from Part One … The Moog Model III didn’t come with a manual. How much was it hit-or-miss to develop the sounds that you wanted? Well, I pretty much grasped immediately what a high/low pass filter was. Because, in my lecture demonstration, with the microphone and my mouth, I would do exactly the same

Rad Lab: Doug McKechnie and the Moog Model III (Part One)

In the late 1960s, Doug McKechnie and his roommate launched the San Francisco Radical Lab, an experimental endeavor launched (in part, as you’ll read) to explore the capabilities of the then new and novel Moog Model III modular synthesizer. The Lab had one of the earliest of that instrument, with the serial number 004. Now

Doug McKechnie’s ‘San Francisco Moog: 1968-1972’

In the late ’60s, the Moog modular synthesizer was still very much an experimental tool. While there had been some ambitious attempts to use the Moog as the centerpiece of recordings — Mort Garson’s 1967 LP The Zodiac: Cosmic Sounds was likely the first album to feature the synthesizer prominently — “serious” use of the

Album Review: Halou – Albatross (Deluxe Edition)

For a time in the 1990s, trip hop was a musical sensation. In some ways an outgrowth of the brief lounge/exotica craze, trip hop (also known as chillwave) owed at least as much to the Neue Deutsche Welle (New German Wave) movement of the ‘80s. But as its name suggests, trip-hop folded in a hip-hop