interview Archive

Vieux Farka Touré Does What Comes Naturally

Vieux Farka Touré is the guitar-playing and singing son of the late Ali Farka Touré, the Malian musician responsible for helping to bridge the gap between traditional West African music and the blues. But from the very beginning of his own musical career, Vieux Farka Touré has charted his own musical path. The elder Touré

Teaming Up: Tommy Keene and Ivan Julian

Tommy Keene and Ivan Julian recently completed a dual solo tour; just ahead of that run, I spoke with Keene. It was the third time I had interviewed him since 2006. — bk Though he got his musical start in the Washington DC area, guitarist Tommy Keene has a real connection to the music scene

The Zombies: A Half-century ‘Odessey’

During 1967’s so-called Summer of Love, the Zombies began recording what would be their defining work, the critically-acclaimed album Odessey and Oracle [sic]. But on its release, the record performed disappointingly on the charts in America as well as in the band’s native England. “When we recorded it, there was no commercial success with this

Points of Intersection: The Regina Spektor Interview

Note: parts of the following story appeared originally in separate features written for the Colorado Springs Independent and Stomp & Stammer. — bk On her seven studio albums – from 11:11, her 2001 debut through her latest, Remember Us to Life, Regina Spektor has made a name for herself as a consummate composer of piano-based

An American in London: The Shel Talmy Interview, Part Three

Continued from Part Two… Over the course of his career, Talmy worked with other highly regarded artists; most but not all of these were UK acts. His production credits include sides – and, more often than not, entire albums – by such well-known artists as Chad and Jeremy, Small Faces, Amen Corner, Pentangle, Bert Jansch

An American in London: The Shel Talmy Interview, Part Two

Continued from Part One… While Talmy was busy producing hits for The Who, The Kinks and others, he found time to produce quite a few lesser-known artists. As an independent producer, he saw his productions released on Andrew Loog Oldham’s Immediate, Pye, Columbia, Decca, London, Fontana, Atco and many others. He started his own label,

An American in London: The Shel Talmy Interview, Part One

In the history of rock and pop, it’s rare that a producer becomes a “rock star.” Certain names have become prominent fixtures in the audio part of pop culture: Phil Spector and George Martin are among the most well-known producers of the 1960s. In later years, Quincy Jones, Jeff Lynne, Brian Eno and Rick Rubin

Long Shot: The Story of Delaney & Bonnie’s ‘Motel Shot’ (Part 2)

Continued from Part One … The Motel Shot that finally saw release would consist almost completely of material from the studio sessions. On release, it fared well, reaching #65 on Billboard‘s album chart. A surprise hit single, “Never Ending Song of Love” rose to #13 on the singles charts. Even in its more refined state,

Long Shot: The Story of Delaney & Bonnie’s ‘Motel Shot’ (Part 1)

As the 1960s rolled over into 1970, popular music was undergoing a seismic shift. The full reasons aren’t totally clear; maybe it was the disillusionment in the wake of the assassinations of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Robert Kennedy. Perhaps it was the cumulative shock experienced at the daily news of the disastrous war in

Arthur Brown’s “Fire” Still Burns (Part 2)

Continued from Part One … Brown believes Tommy is “an amazing piece of work. But rock opera? I don’t buy it. There just isn’t a real name for it.” And so it was with the suite of songs on Side One of The Crazy World of Arthur Brown, with “Fire” as its centerpiece. Brown thinks