reissue Archive

Reviews: Five Limited-edition Vinyl Releases

Some recent vinyl releases are more than noteworthy. Herewith are looks at five of ’em. I’m pretty certain all are limited-edition pressings, so get them while they’re hot. Kenny Clarke et. al. – Bohemia After Dark Nominally a session led by drummer Kenny Clarke, this 1955 album is of great historical import as the recorded

Album Reviews: Five LPs from Flying Nun Records

The New Zealand-based Flying Nun Records has a well-earned reputation for interesting, largely DIY sounds, all emanating from the small island country off Australia’s east coast. You won’t find any Hobbit-themed music here; what you will find is never less than intriguing. All of these reviewed albums were provided to me in my favorite format:

Album Review: The Deadly Ones — It’s Monster Surfing Time

Two of pop culture’s kitschiest phenomenons collide on this new reissue of an ultra-rare LP from 1964. Not counting revivals and renewed interest, surf rock was popular from about 1962 to ’64 (a year that – not at all coincidentally – The Beatles took off in America). Originally centered around southern California, the style quickly

Current and Coming Attractions, Spring 2016

I’ve been a busy boy lately, and not just as pertains to this blog. I’ve placed features in the Colorado Springs Independent; in addition to the weekly “Sound Advice” column I share with fellow critic Loring Wirbel, I write features for that altweekly. Those appear here two weeks after they run on csindy.com and in

Hundred-word Reviews for February 2016, Part 5

This latest week-long dive into my backlog of worthy music for review wraps up with five archival releases. Vulgar Boatmen – You and Your Sister First things first: the album title (and title song) have no relation whatsoever to the same-named song by Big Star‘s Chris Bell. There’s not really much in common stylewise, either;

Album Review: Game Theory — Lolita Nation

I know people who are way-into the rock subgenre known as power pop. I’m one of those people myself, and I make no apologies for it. And while most aficionados of the style acknowledge the debt owed to earlier pioneers such as Badfinger, The Raspberries and a select few others from that era, the mention

Album Review: Alice Cooper – Muscle of Love (SACD)

Dedicated fans of 1970s rock know that Alice Cooper means two different things: there’s the vocalist born Vincent Furnier, and there’s the group he fronted from the late 1960s (when they were known as The Spiders) through 1973. Though post-’73 albums were released bearing the name Alice Cooper, those (with the exception of 1974’s Greatest

Album Review: Todd Rundgren & Utopia — Disco Jets

Todd Rundgren has long been known for being, as the expression goes, ahead of the curve. His experiments, forays, and even innovations in computer and video technology are well-documented. The same holds true for his pioneering work with artist-to-peer networks, the too-ahead-of-its-time PatroNet service of the mid 1990s. And of course Rundgren has always been

Hundred-word Reviews January 2016: Reissues

Today’s collection of hundred-word reviews focuses on recent reissues of note. Uriah Heep – Totally Driven I’m not going to try to tell you that the turn of the 21st century was Uriah Heep‘s finest hour. Their high point was in the early 1970s, around the time of Demons and Wizards and The Magician’s Birthday

Album Review: Love — Reel to Real

In the community of pop music critics and historians, it’s common to find Love‘s Forever Changes cited as one of the great lost albums of the 1960s. Under-recognized at the time of its release, Forever Changes has in recent years taken its rightful place among musical treasures of its era. There it joins The Beach