reissue Archive

Album Review: The Orion Experience – Cosmicandy

If Jellyfish had added bouncy dance pop to their primary influences alongside inspirations like Supertramp, Wings and Queen, they might have sounded something like The Orion Experience. Released in 2006, Cosmicandy sounds like a thrilling combination of The Cars, Blondie, Green Day, The Muffs, The B-52s, The Pandoras and ABBA. Or something. These giddy, saucy

Album Reviews: Four from Jonathan Richman and the Modern Lovers (Part 2 of 2)

Picking up where I left off in my discussion of four Jonathan Richman and the Modern Lovers reissues from Omnivore Recordings… Rock ‘n’ Roll with the Modern Lovers (1977) Bizarre in the extreme, the record opens with a traditional Japanese folk instrumental. The album cover looks like a children’s record, and the song selection (“Wheels

Album Reviews: Four from Jonathan Richman and the Modern Lovers (Part 1 of 2)

Certain artists seem to get a kind of free pass from critics. In the cases that come to mind, these artists created something really, really, really special and important, and then arguably never again came close to creating works that even approached the significance of their breakthrough. I’m as guilty as anyone of falling into

Album Review: Eric Slick – Palisades

A former student (alongside his sister Julie Slick) at the Paul Green School of Rock Music, Eric Slick was catapulted to well-deserved fame when Adrian Belew chose him and Julie to work as his rhythm section in the Adrian Belew Power Trio in the mid- to late 2000s. From there, Eric joined Dr. Dog as

Album Review: The Krayolas — Happy Go Lucky

If the Smithereens were from Texas instead of New Jersey – and if they built on their Beatles influences not by exploring an affinity for Black Sabbath but instead for the Sir Douglas Quintet – then they might sound a bit like The Krayolas. With a chirpy demeanor, jangling guitars and peppy hand claps, The

Album review: Azymuth – Telecommunication

It may be difficult to imagine such a thing today, some five decades after the fact, but in the early 1970s, jazz/funk/fusion was more than a blip on the commercial landscape of the music industry. Though jazz would – sadly, and in short order – soon morph into the dreaded “smooth jazz” of artists like

Album Review: Anthony “Big A” Sherrod and The Cornlickers – Right On Time

Anthony “Big A” Sherrod is a Clarksdale, Mississippi native and lives there to this very day; he teaches blues to young students at the Delta Blues Museum’s Blues & Education program. Gritty, powerful and heartfelt, his approach to the blues – backed by his band The Cornlickers – helps keep the juke joint tradition alive.

Album Review: The Gun Club — The Las Vegas Story

Blixa Sounds’ campaign of reissues of The Gun Club’s catalog continues with a new, expanded version of the group’s third album, 1984’s The Las Vegas Story. Continuing with the moody, atmospheric punk aesthetic of their previous work, The Las Vegas Story may well be the group’s high water mark. While 1981’s Fire of Love was

Everclear’s ‘World of Noise’ gets First-ever Digital Reissue

Portland, Oregon based rockers Everclear broke through to the big time in 1995 with “Santa Monica,” a hit track off their major-label debut album, Sparkle and Fade. But nearly two years earlier, they crafted a raw, rough and ready musical document, the independently released World of Noise. Self-produced by the band led by singer and

Album Review: Bill Evans – You Must Believe in Spring

Bill Evans was a prolific as he was gifted. In the course of his short life, Evans released more than 50 albums, and contributed his piano talents to at least as many releases by other artists. He died in September 1980, and shortly after his passing, a new album appeared. Recorded in 1977, You Must