reissue Archive

Album Review: Jim Basnight and The Moberlys – Seattle – New York – Los Angeles

Describing something as underrated is sometimes little more than a lazy way of approaching an artist’s work. But it can have useful meaning. In the case of The Moberlys, the group could well be described that way. But the label doesn’t quite get to the heart of the matter: how can you be underrated if

Album Review: The Black Watch — Led Zeppelin Five

I don’t make a habit of employing Yiddish words or phrases in writing of speaking. I’m not a member of the tribe. But when the situations call for it, when no other word will do, I make an exception. Here goes: The Black Watch has some chutzpah. Or at least they did in 2011, when

Album Review: The Gun Club — Fire of Love

Blixa Sounds released an expanded reissue of the Gun Club’s Miami in 2000, and now their similar treatment of the Los Angeles punk band’s debut album, Fire of Love, is getting similar treatment. Oddly – at least to these ears – it’s more accessible than the second LP. Yes, Jeffrey Lee Pierce’s open relationship with

Nina Simone is #trending in 2021

Nina Simone is trending in 2021. Nearly two decades after her death, the Tryon, N.C.-born musician, vocalist songwriter and civil rights activist is as popular as ever. Just over a year ago, the Nina Simone Project launched a fundraising campaign to establish an official Nina Simone Archive in Tryon. In June of this year, a

Album Review: Snowglobe — Doing the Distance

Doing the Distance is full of surprises, especially for listeners who approach it without preconceived notions. After a brief, brass-centric intro (“Theme Music,”) the group shifts into what initially sounds like a kind of Wilco-influenced country rock. But those horns pop back into the mix, alerting the listener that perhaps Snowglobe has a wider musical

Album Review: Laura Nyro — Trees of the Ages

Laura Nyro was a talent of staggering dimensions. Not only was the New York singer-songwriter possessed of a preternatural ability to write enduing melodies – many of which were hits for other artists – but she was a powerful presence on her own recordings. The controversial and notorious alleged-disaster of a performance at Monterey Pop

Album Review: The Beat Farmers — Tales of the New West

One of the more fascinating characteristics of ‘80s new wave / college rock / alternative (or whatever you’d care to call it) was the manner in which it folded in genres of music that had previously been considered outside the scope of pop music. Or at least outside the scope for the population who listened

Thirty Years with the Mother Hips (Part Three)

Continued from Part Two … “We started in Wisconsin and ended near San Francisco at the Shoreline Amphitheater,” Tim Bluhm recalls. “And by that time, we were headlining the side stage. It was a big moment for us: a lot of people say that’s the first time they saw us.” In 2007, around the time

Thirty Years with the Mother Hips (Part Two)

Continued from Part One … Tim Bluhm concedes that the Mother Hips fan base isn’t as large as the following of some other groups, but he believes that their followers’ loyalty more than makes up for their numbers. “They’re very dedicated to what we do,” he says. But that doesn’t mean that they accept everything

Thirty Years with the Mother Hips (Part One)

Popular West Coast Band reissues its entire studio catalog, on vinyl for the first time Some artists have made a successful career out of establishing a signature sound and then sticking with it over the course of their entire catalog. Other artists take a potentially riskier approach, following their muse wherever it takes them. The