reissue Archive

Hundred-word Reviews for May 2022, Part 2

I present five more reviews, in capsule form. Three of these are new releases; two are archival titles. All are deserving of deeper investigation. Alice Austin – Goodnight Euphoria Los Angeles-based singer-songwriter Austin has crafted a supremely satisfying slab of rock with Goodnight Euphoria. Her innate sense of pop songwriting is combined with expertly textured

Album Review: Jeannie C. Riley — Harper Valley P.T.A.

I’ve gone on about this idea before, but it never ceases to fascinate me, so I’ll mention it again. Those of us of a certain age — boomers, I guess you’d say – came of age in an era that was characterized in part at least by shared experience. Where popular culture was concerned, pretty

Album Review: Detective — s/t

By the mid 1970s, having one’s own boutique record label was a symbol of Having Arrived. The Beatles started it all with Apple, and within a few years, The Moody Blues had Threshold, Deep Purple had (naturally) Purple Records, and The Rolling Stones had their own eponymous label. So it came as little surprise when

Album Review: Scott McCarl — Play On

I am sure we can agree as to the wonderfulness that is The Raspberries’ catalog. “Go All the Way” is pop perfection, taking the “don’t bore us; get to the chorus” aesthetic to the extreme in its quest for rock’n’roll transcendence. And though they released only four albums in their ‘70s run, what a great

Album Review: The Mommyheads — Swiss Army Knife

The Mommyheads released their debut album Acorn in 1989. A wholebuncha albums followed; the prolific Brooklyn-based group would release four more albums before going inactive in the late ‘90s. When they returned around 2008, their reissues and new albums created a large catalog. These days the band seems to alternate between new and archival reissues,

Album Review: Natalie Cole — Unforgettable…With Love

By the early 1990s, Natalie Cole was anything but a newcomer to the music world. Daughter of legendary Nat “King” Cole, she had long since established herself as an R&B/soul vocalist, and had racked up an impressive string of hit singles and well-received albums. Always reluctant to ride upon the coattails of her father –

Album Review: The Loud Family and Anton Barbeau – What if it Works?

When two formidable talents get together, one doesn’t know quite what to expect. Auteurs who are accustomed to having things their own way — and who have long since earned the right to do so – can’t automatically be expected to play well with others in a collaborative venture. The product of that creative alliance

Album Review: The Troggs — The Trogg Tapes

First, a few words about what this isn’t. It’s not the infamous “Troggs Tapes” studio outtake, an audio gem that initially circulated among aficionados and collectors of the strange and hilarious. That tape is a 1970 document of members of The Troggs arguing in the recording studio, and is responsible for adding the immortal phrases

Album Review: Love Tractor — Themes from Venus

It’s worth noting that Atlanta and Athens, Georgia are a mere 70 miles apart. I mention this because back in the 1980s when I lived in the suburbs of Atlanta (I was ultimately in the metro area for some 27 years) and followed the local music scene, it was a common mistake to think of

Album Review: The Left Banke – Strangers on a Train

When the terms “baroque pop” or “baroque rock” come up in conversation, discussion of The Left Banke is assuredly to follow. While the group scored only a few hits – “Walk Away Reneé,” “Pretty Ballerina” and the lesser-known but equally wonderful “She May Call You Up Tonight” – they established a stylistic template that other