Americana Archive

November 100-word Reviews, Part 3

Today as my regular series of hundred-word reviews continues, I turn my attention toward the sounds of Americana. For my purposes, the term is even more loosey-goosey than the one used by the Americana Music Association: I include blues, rock, and singer/songwriter styles. And why not? Various – In their Own Words, Vols. 1 and

AmericanaFest Panel: Breaking Barriers Through #SocialNetworking

I recently had the pleasure and honor of joining a distinguished panel to discuss social networking as it applies as a tool for musicians. In addition to my years as a music journalist, I have nearly three decades’ practical experience in marketing and advertising, and have been a freelance web developer (my rarely-mentioned “day job”)

Cold and Bitter Tears: The Songs of Ted Hawkins

I didn’t know a thing about Ted Hawkins and his music before arriving in Nashville. But among tastemakers, the long-dead folk/Americana (though the term Americana wasn’t in use during his lifetime) troubadour has clearly effected great influence. Though homeless and itinerant, Hawkins became a mainstay of Venice Beach music venues, and seemed on the verge

Concert Review: The Americana Music Honors & Awards, Nashville TN, September 16 2015

I recently attended the Americana Music Honors & Awards show in Nashville, Tennessee. Wait, wait: stay with me here. While it’s true that I’m not known far and wide as a fan (much less an aficionado) of the genre, I’m increasingly finding that a slice of it now and then does appeal to me. In

Album Mini-review: Holly Golightly — Slowtown Now!

File Next to: Chris Isaak, Lucinda Williams A recording artist with an extensive back catalog, Golightly and her backing musicians showcase their stylistic breadth on this oddly-titled album. Electric guitars sit comfortably beside upright bass in these sparely arranged but fascinating tunes. Golightly sings all self-penned material here, save a smoking, fuzz-guitar-ified cover of Rudy

The Revelers: Get Ready to Move the Tables and Dance

Eclectic Louisiana-based group The Revelers make music for dancing. “It has to be danceable,” says multi-instrumentalist Daniel Coolik. “We pride ourselves on being a get-up-and-move sort of band. That’s where we come from. If you play stuff that people can’t dance to, they’re just not going to come out.” When called upon to do so,

Hundred-word Reviews for September (sic), Part 1 of 8

Time to clear the backlog of discs – worthy ones all – cluttering my office. Beginning today, and occasionally interrupted by other content, here’s a solid two weeks of hundred-word reviews. Terell Stafford – BrotherLee Love Lee Morgan was a hard bop trumpeter who recorded between the mid 1950s and 1971, mostly for the Blue

Album Review: Warren Haynes — Ashes & Dust

A true son of the South, guitarist Warren Haynes has built a varied career imbued with musical values that proudly display his Appalachian roots. And though he’s strongly associated with the electric guitar – largely through his work with Gov’t Mule and The Allman Brothers Band – his interests have always extended well beyond the

Matthew E. White’s Calibrated Subtlety

Matthew E. White has been musically active for many years, including collaborations with Megafaun and the Mountain Goats and three albums with avant-jazz group Fight the Big Bull. But as an artist recording and touring under his own name, he’s a relative newcomer. The story making the rounds is that White’s debut – 2012’s Big

Album Review: The Mavericks — Mono

There’s much talk these days about the sorry state of country music. The genre – commercially, more popular than ever – is overrun with what its detractors call “bro country.” Hopelessly (some might say defiantly) clichéd songs about yellow beer, Friday nights, pickup trucks, mean ol’/clueless big city types and whatnot are the coin of