compilation Archive

Album Review: The Scenics — In the Summer

In early 2013 I reviewed Dead Man Walks Down Bayview, a then-new album from Toronto-based band The Scenics. In that review, I made clear both my nearly nonexistent knowledge of the Toronto punk scene of the 1970s (or any era, for that matter) as well as my appreciation for the music on the contemporary album.

Hundred-word Reviews January 2016: Compilations

This week-long run of quick reviews wraps up today with looks at five excellent compilation albums. King Curtis – The Complete Atco Singles Real Gone Music swings for the fences with this, a three-CD set that collects all of the saxophonist’s 64 a- and b-sides released on the Atlantic subsidiary (plus two unreleased tracks). Randy

Album Review: Ty Segall — Ty Rex

Modern-day garage rock hero Ty Segall has never been bashful about showing his roots. Listening to both his original material and his musical contributions to others’ work (most notably Mikal Cronin), it’s quite easy to connect the dots: there’s a clear progression from teenage 1960s garage rock groups to The Stooges to Lenny Kaye‘s Nuggets

Album Mini-review: Bobby Rush — Chicken Heads: A 50 Year History of Bobby Rush

File next to: James Brown, Buddy Guy, Otis Redding Bobby Rush‘s musical career has spanned fifty years, at least twenty record labels, and most American popular music genres. He’s tough to pigeonhole: Rush’s music encompasses soul, r&b, funk, blues, and more. He’s earned several awards and scored chart singles. Compiling a career-spanning survey of his

Album Mini-review: DM3 — West of Anywhere

File Next to: Shoes, Cheap Trick, Raspberries If you were American and into power pop, the 1990s was a decade filled with riches. You could blissfully ignore all that dreadful hair metal and the wooly, flannel-shirted grunge scene, and instead enjoy the high-octane, hook-filled pleasures of music from Jellyfish, Redd Kross, Matthew Sweet, Michael Penn,

Album Reviews: Five from Fantastic Voyage

The hits just keep on coming. Fantastic Voyage is a London-based label that specializes in thematically-oriented archival reissue collections. In the last few months, they seem to have significantly stepped up their release schedule. And all of the latest titles rise to the high standard of previous FV sets. I don’t know the specifics of

Box Set Review: George Duke — The Era Will Prevail (Part Two)

Continued from Part One… Vol. 3: Feel Released in October 1974, Feel again featured bassist John Heard and drummer Ndugu alongside George Duke, but his guest artists lent a decidedly adventurous air to the disc: husband and wife Airto Moreira (the Brazilian percussionist Duke knew well through his association with Julian “Cannonball” Adderley) and Flora

Box Set Review: George Duke — The Era Will Prevail (Part One)

George Duke (1946-2013) was one of the most fascinating figures in music during the second half of the 20th century. Duke was a jazz-and-classically trained musician proficient on any number of instruments, though he is best known as a keyboard player. He got his start collaborating with French virtuoso violinist Jean-Luc Ponty, and his early

Album Review: Bill Evans — The Complete Fantasy Recordings

Bill Evans was a singular figure in the world of music, and even more so within the context of the jazz idiom. His music could never quite be described as inviting; most all of his piano compositions and recordings have an insular quality. Listening to Evans, a listener might even experience a feeling of unease,

DVD Review: Escala Musical TV 1966-67

I took three years of Spanish in high school – seemingly a thousand years ago, more like thirty – and to this day I can correctly pronounce the items on a Mexican restaurant menu and/or say things that will get my face slapped (though hopefully not at the same time). That’s about my skill level.