compilation Archive

Whenever You’re Ready: Brian Auger Celebrates 60 Years in Music (Part 3 of 3)

Continued from Part Two… The electric fusion group drew inspiration from across the musical landscape, combining sounds the likes of which one might find on a Miles Davis album of the era with a funky soul and r&b sensibility. Among the Oblivion Express’ most beloved recordings is a scintillating Auger original, “Happiness is Just Around

Whenever You’re Ready: Brian Auger Celebrates 60 Years in Music (Part 2 of 3)

Continued from Part One… Not long thereafter, Auger was leading an organ trio at a Manchester club called The Twisted Wheel. There he was approached by a “rather tall guy.” Long John Baldry, as he was known, was a household figure in British music, having been a guest on two Beatles TV programs. Baldry asked

Whenever You’re Ready: Brian Auger Celebrates 60 Years in Music (Part 1 of 3)

New collection of classic and rarities from the celebrated music figure Organist, composer, vocalist and band leader Brian Auger is best known for his work leading two bands: in the ‘60s he launched The Trinity, a pioneering soul/jazz/rock outfit featuring powerhouse vocalist Julie Driscoll. And in the early ‘70s Auger pursued ambitious yet accessible jazz

EP Review The Fuzztones – Encore

For forever now, The Fuzztones have been bringing their trademark version of garage punk to enthusiastic listeners. In recent years, main Fuzztone Rudi Protrudi has turned his focus toward tributes, books and films, all of which have helped to cement the group’s place in rock’n’roll firmament. What there hasn’t been a lot of is new

Album Review: SVT — Always Comes Back

As I’ve mentioned before, SVT is the band most often named among those interviewed for my latest book as the Bay Area band most deserving of greater success than they found. With a sound that touched on new wave, punk and power pop and featured the extraordinarily talented Jack Casady (Jefferson Airplane, Hot Tuna) on

Album Review: Various — Always Memphis Rock and Roll

For me, the Black & Wyatt Records label is a trademark of quality. Since its launch in 2018, the Memphis label has sought to bring interesting and outside-the-box music to the wider public. And it’s been quite successful on that score: I’ve covered a number of Black & Wyatt releases here on Musoscribe, including titles

Album Review: Scott McCarl — Play On

I am sure we can agree as to the wonderfulness that is The Raspberries’ catalog. “Go All the Way” is pop perfection, taking the “don’t bore us; get to the chorus” aesthetic to the extreme in its quest for rock’n’roll transcendence. And though they released only four albums in their ‘70s run, what a great

Album Review: Muddy Waters — The Montreux Years

Claude Nobs was a towering figure in popular music. Founder of the Montreux Jazz Festival, he was responsible for bringing a stunning array of performers together, year after year on the stages in Switzerland. The second largest annual jazz festival on the planet, since its launch in 1967 Montreux has long taken a big-tent approach,

Album Review: The Jars — Make Love Not War

My new book, Disturbing the Peace: 415 Records and the Rise of New Wave explores the story of the Bay Area independent record label and the nearly 30 artists – most all local to the Bay Area – who released music on 415. The punk and new wave scene of the late ‘70s and early-to-mid

Album Review: The Sound of Glassboro, 1980s

The reductive nature of popular culture dictates that when we recall the 1980s, we’re supposed to think of shoulder pads, big hair and vacuous MTV-era acts like Thompson Twins. But as those of us who came of age in that era know, the ‘80s also saw the ascendancy of punk and new wave and the