compilation Archive

Album Review: The Traveling Wilburys Collection

I’m not at all certain when the term supergroup first entered popular usage. I do know that it’s been badly misused more often than not: I recall seeing it used on magazine covers back when Duran Duran was all the rage: think of them what you will, but they were never a supergroup. One of

DVD Review: International Beat Music Vol. 1

It’s long been established that The Beatles and The Rolling Stones had an incalculable influence upon pop culture of the 1960s and beyond. What’s perhaps less well-known – at least among Anglophone listeners – -is the extent to which those groups made an impression on the music scenes in (nominally) non-English-speaking countries. The DVD International

Current and Coming Attractions, Spring 2016

I’ve been a busy boy lately, and not just as pertains to this blog. I’ve placed features in the Colorado Springs Independent; in addition to the weekly “Sound Advice” column I share with fellow critic Loring Wirbel, I write features for that altweekly. Those appear here two weeks after they run on csindy.com and in

Album Review: The Miamis — We Deliver

I hold Omnivore Recordings in the highest esteem: the collective taste of their prime movers is beyond reproach, and they’ve been responsible for some of the most thoughtful reissues of recent years. In an industry built on hype, Omnivore is rightly known as staying well above overselling the virtues of their releases. So when I

Album Review: Arthur Lee / Love — Coming Through to You: The Live Recordings (1970-2004)

With the (both critically and commercially) belated realization by the music world-at-large that Love‘s 1967 album Forever Changes is a classic came an unfortunate misconception. That was the idea that once the original lineup of Love broke up, Arthur Lee and/or his subsequent Love didn’t produce anything of lasting value. It’s true on one hand

Album Review: The Scenics — In the Summer

In early 2013 I reviewed Dead Man Walks Down Bayview, a then-new album from Toronto-based band The Scenics. In that review, I made clear both my nearly nonexistent knowledge of the Toronto punk scene of the 1970s (or any era, for that matter) as well as my appreciation for the music on the contemporary album.

Hundred-word Reviews January 2016: Compilations

This week-long run of quick reviews wraps up today with looks at five excellent compilation albums. King Curtis – The Complete Atco Singles Real Gone Music swings for the fences with this, a three-CD set that collects all of the saxophonist’s 64 a- and b-sides released on the Atlantic subsidiary (plus two unreleased tracks). Randy

Album Review: Ty Segall — Ty Rex

Modern-day garage rock hero Ty Segall has never been bashful about showing his roots. Listening to both his original material and his musical contributions to others’ work (most notably Mikal Cronin), it’s quite easy to connect the dots: there’s a clear progression from teenage 1960s garage rock groups to The Stooges to Lenny Kaye‘s Nuggets

Album Mini-review: Bobby Rush — Chicken Heads: A 50 Year History of Bobby Rush

File next to: James Brown, Buddy Guy, Otis Redding Bobby Rush‘s musical career has spanned fifty years, at least twenty record labels, and most American popular music genres. He’s tough to pigeonhole: Rush’s music encompasses soul, r&b, funk, blues, and more. He’s earned several awards and scored chart singles. Compiling a career-spanning survey of his

Album Mini-review: DM3 — West of Anywhere

File Next to: Shoes, Cheap Trick, Raspberries If you were American and into power pop, the 1990s was a decade filled with riches. You could blissfully ignore all that dreadful hair metal and the wooly, flannel-shirted grunge scene, and instead enjoy the high-octane, hook-filled pleasures of music from Jellyfish, Redd Kross, Matthew Sweet, Michael Penn,