compilation Archive

NRBQ: the Unity of Man (and of former members), Part 2

Continued from Part One … From NRBQ‘s start, jazz pianist Thelonious Monk was a hero to Terry Adams and his band mates. “The music of Thelonious had a big impact on me when I was a teenager,” he says. “I took a lot in, and heard him live many times, and needed to give it

NRBQ: the Unity of Man (and of former members), Part 1

Longtime critics’ darlings NRBQ has kept the music going in one form or another since before recording and releasing its self-titled debut album in 1969. While sales figures of NRBQ’s more than 30 albums haven’t made the group a household name, the Q’s rich blend of American musical forms – rock, jazz, blues, rockabilly and

Hundred-word Reviews for Nov./Dec. 2016, Part 4 of 10

Happy Thanksgiving. Here are five more quick reviews. Today it’s all jazz. John Surman et. al. – Morning Glory If your tastes extend toward free and modal jazz – think Ornette Coleman, for example – then a new reissue of this 1973 live album may be just the thing for you. Alternating between high-flying musical

Hundred-word Reviews for Nov./Dec. 2016, Part 3 of 10

Five more quick reviews of archival/reissue material. Three of today’s five are from Grammy-award winning label Omnivore Recordings. One of these days I’ll write liner notes for one of their fine releases; I just know it. Meantime, I’ll review the ones that I dig (which, as it happens, is nearly all of ’em). The Beach

John Mayall: “Live in 1967” and Live in 2016

Though he doesn’t actively encourage the label, John Mayall has for many years now been known as “the godfather of the British blues boom.” He’s revered in blues and rock circles both for his impressive body of work and for his prescient ability to hire some of the best musicians for his various bands. Now

Album Mini-review: The Archies — Sugar, Sugar: The Complete Albums Collection

File next to: Bay City Rollers, 1910 Fruitgum Company, The Jackson 5 After his experience with The Monkees, pop impresario Don Kirshner made the calculated decision that his next project would be one in which the artists couldn’t rebel. Thus was born The Archies, a cartoon group that only existed on television. Well, that’s not

Album Review: The Scientists — A Place Called Bad

For American music consumers in the late 1970s and early ’80s, Australia may as well have been in another galaxy as on the other side of the globe; in those pre-Internet days, getting information about the existence of – much less the actual music by – bands from down under was no easy task. Even

Album Review: The Traveling Wilburys Collection

I’m not at all certain when the term supergroup first entered popular usage. I do know that it’s been badly misused more often than not: I recall seeing it used on magazine covers back when Duran Duran was all the rage: think of them what you will, but they were never a supergroup. One of

DVD Review: International Beat Music Vol. 1

It’s long been established that The Beatles and The Rolling Stones had an incalculable influence upon pop culture of the 1960s and beyond. What’s perhaps less well-known – at least among Anglophone listeners – -is the extent to which those groups made an impression on the music scenes in (nominally) non-English-speaking countries. The DVD International

Current and Coming Attractions, Spring 2016

I’ve been a busy boy lately, and not just as pertains to this blog. I’ve placed features in the Colorado Springs Independent; in addition to the weekly “Sound Advice” column I share with fellow critic Loring Wirbel, I write features for that altweekly. Those appear here two weeks after they run on csindy.com and in