folk Archive

Album Review: Battleground Korea: Songs and Sounds of America’s Forgotten War

Readers old enough to remember the long-running and beloved television sitcom M*A*S*H likely know that according to its creators, even though the show was set in wartime Korea, it was really about American involvement in Vietnam. But despite the show’s comedic framework, it managed to explore some important truths about that ill-advised endeavor in southeast

Chuck Brodsky’s One of Us

With the exception of a trio of records he released in the final years of the 20th century, Chuck Brodsky has long been the model of the independent, do-it-yourself artist. It’s just that now, the music business as a whole is catching up with his approach. “The whole business model has changed,” says the singer-songwriter.

Album Review: Kate Fenner — Middle Voice

As “Two Minds” opens Middle Voice, one might think that Kate Fenner is merely another in a waif-viced singer-songwriters. But give the song a moment to unfold, and both it and its singer/composer reveal greater depth. There’s a windswept Americana feel to the music, with a mood and sensibility that evokes pleasant memories of Bob

Album Review: Anywhere — Anywhere II

Anywhere is an aggregation of indie/underground artists who collectively make a psychedelic folk sound. But Anywhere doesn’t sound like acid-folk, though: there’s a solid rock foundation to the group’s music. A swirling feel that conjures memories of the Beatles’ “Tomorrow Never Knows” characterizes songs like “Bone Flute Blues.” On II, Anywhere conjures a soaring, surprisingly

A Look Back at Bob Dylan’s “Blood on the Tracks”

This feature originally appeared on BestClassicBands. By the time of 1975’s Blood on the Tracks, Bob Dylan had moved through a succession of distinct musical personae. Beginning his career as a Woody Guthrie acolyte, Dylan soon established his own voice, singing and writing original folk protest songs. After famously “going electric,” Dylan bent the rock

Hundred-word Reviews: New Releases

There’s quite a massive stack of new (or at least new-when-I got-’em) releases here at Musoscribe World HQ. Time to review them. 6-String Drag – Top of the World (Schoolkids Records) This Raleigh-based group was at the forefront of the Americana scene, back when it didn’t even have a name (some called it alt-country). After

Album Review: The Rough and Tumble — We Made Ourselves a Home…

The Rough & Tumble is the folk-Americana duo of Mallory Graham and Scott Tyler. These days the pair consider themselves at home on the road, but in the Rough & Tumble’s bio, the nomadic pair say that they “used to say they were from Nashville.” And before that, Graham (who was born in Pennsylvania) and

Album Review: Andrew Reed – If All the World Were Right

For many people, Asheville, North Carolina is and intentional destination. Set aside for the moment those retirees who settle here for their golden years. For young and middle-aged adults, it’s a city to which they are drawn. People move to Asheville in hope of effecting a life change. It’s wholly unlike larger nearby cities such

Boxed Set Review: Woody Guthrie — The Tribute Concerts

A tribute to a giant in popular music and American culture such as Woody Guthrie deserves no less than the most lavish – yet still dignified – package possible, and with The Tribute Concerts, Bear Family Productions has delivered just that. A weighty set – both in terms of content and physical form – The

Album Review: Angel Olsen — Phases

Across her first three albums and an EP, Asheville’s own Angel Olsen has carved out a musical niche of her own. Her music is perhaps best described as a collection of familiar, well-worn melodies and styles to which she applies her own stamp. Her most recent release of new material, 2016’s My Woman drew upon