cowpunk Archive

Holly Golightly: The Country-punk-blues One-take wonder

British-born Holly Golightly was an important part of the UK garage-punk scene of the 1990s. Today her music effectively combines that foundation with a sound that draws equally from classic American country and western music. Her latest album, Clippety Clop, was created in her well-established way: working with life-and-music partner Lawyer Dave, Golightly recorded the

Album Mini-review: Supersuckers — Holdin’ the Bag

File Next to: Long Ryders, Jason & the Scorchers, Peter Case If Michael Jackson could hubristically anoint himself King of Pop, it stands to reason that Supersuckers should be allowed to crown themselves the Greatest Rock’n’Roll Band in the World. Though past efforts have found the rowdy trio cranking out hard rock, they’re not a

November 100-word Reviews, Part 3

Today as my regular series of hundred-word reviews continues, I turn my attention toward the sounds of Americana. For my purposes, the term is even more loosey-goosey than the one used by the Americana Music Association: I include blues, rock, and singer/songwriter styles. And why not? Various – In their Own Words, Vols. 1 and

Hundred-word Reviews for September, Part 8 of 8

This current round of hundred-word reviews wraps up with four archival/reissue releases from the fine folks at Omnivore Recordings, and a self-released retrospective form an overlooked Nashville group. Raging Fire – Everything is Roses: Anthology 1985-1989 The nexus wherein country and punk styles meet has been explored by a number of noteworthy bands: X and

Book Review: Mavericks of Sound

There’s something endlessly fascinating about the creative process. And of course it’s not merely one process; it’s wholly unique for each individual. And because that’s true, conversations with those engage in creative output are often illuminating. David Ensminger clearly agrees: he’s compiled a book’s worth of his own conversations into a volume called Mavericks of

November Hundred-word Reviews, Part 2

Once again, it’s time for a run of hundred-word reviews. My inbox has been overflowing of late, and even after removing the material that I deem not worth my time (nor yours), I’m left with far too many discs to cover in my customary manner (500-800 word reviews). So herewith are twenty-five –count ’em, twenty-five

Album Review: Lone Justice – This is Lone Justice: The Vaught Tapes, 1983

One of the most enduring characteristics of 80s “alternative” music was the cross-fertilization between country and rock. This 80s variant rocked harder than earlier efforts by The Byrds and/or The Flying Burrito Brothers, and was exemplified by a number of excellent bands. The Long Ryders, The Blasters, Jason and the Scorchers, BoDeans and Lone Justice

Album Review: Hymn for Her Presents Lucy and Wayne’s Smokin’ Flames

Rock’n’roll doesn’t have a long list of successful male-female duets; at least not ones that, y’know, rock. Other traditions have done well with the duet format: Porter Wagoner and Dolly Parton, Johnny Cash and June Carter Cash, the one-off Frank and Nancy Sinatra duet, and others. But when it comes to hard-driving rocking, there just

Album Review: Hayseed Dixie – A Hot Piece of Grass

Hayseed Dixie is bluegrass music’s answer to Dread Zeppelin. But then, who asked the question? Hayseed Dixie’s high-concept approach recasts hard rock songs in a bluegrass context (for a secret message, say “Hayseed Dixie” out loud, over and over, until you get it). These guys most certainly have a sense of humor — how else