live shows Archive

Live from Laurel Canyon: Songs and Stories of American Folk Rock

In the Hollywood Hills West district of Los Angeles, a mere two miles from Hollywood Boulevard, there exists a relatively secluded region called Laurel Canyon. Beginning in the middle 1960s and continuing for about a decade, the canyon became an incubator for a particular kind of music. Songwriters flocked to the Canyon, making homes there,

World Music Dance Party

Two bands, each led by high-profile fixtures of the Asheville music scene, came together in March to present a unique night of music. Michael Libramento’s band, Coconut Cake, pays homage to the music of 1960s African Congo, while Ram Mandelkorn’s group, Below the Bassline, explores the work of Jamaican guitarist-composer Ernest Ranglin. The two musical

Comics Drawn to the Magnetic

Comedy is serious business. Developing a stand-up routine that feels spontaneous takes a great deal of effort, and when a performer is onstage with little more than a microphone and a spotlight, there’s nowhere to hide. Four accomplished comics – two from Western North Carolina and two based in Colorado – bravely brought their humorous

Concert Review: The Neal Morse Band, Feb. 11 2019 The Neighborhood Theatre, Charlotte NC

Neal Morse is well established as a key figure in American progressive rock, a field that—certainly as compared to its British and European counterparts—is sparsely populated. But even if there were exponentially more prog artists operating in the U.S., it’s assured that Morse would still be at the top of the heap. Morse first came

Peter Asher and Jeremy Clyde: Vintage British Pop’s Modern-day Dynamic Duo

Note: This is the second of two feature/interviews with Peter Asher and Jeremy Clyde, originally written for two different print outlets. There’s a tiny bit of overlap in the introductory sections, but the bulk of each story features original material unique to that feature — bk Back in the early 1960s there appeared in London

They Go to Pieces: Peter Asher and Jeremy Stuart Team Up

Note: This is the first of two feature/interviews with Peter Asher and Jeremy Clyde, originally written for two different print outlets. There’s a tiny bit of overlap in the introductory sections, but the bulk of each story features original material unique to that feature — bk Pop music fans of a certain age will remember

Ozzy Osbourne Says Farewell But Not Goodbye

If Black Sabbath didn’t single-handedly invent a particular kind of heavy rock, the Birmingham, England group certainly refined it. Beginning with the group’s self-titled 1970 debut, Black Sabbath proved itself as an exemplar of a doom-laden, melodramatic kind of rock. The band’s first six albums are now widely recognized as highly influential genre classics. Tony

Warren Haynes’ Christmas Jam at 30: Supporting the Habit(at)

Near the end of the 1980s, local Asheville guitarist Warren Haynes organized an informal musical get-together. Conceived as an opportunity for touring and journeyman musicians to congregate during the holidays – the one time each year when many of them would return home – the Christmas Jam would eventually evolve into something much grander. An

Oxford American Celebrates N.C. Music

North Carolina has a rich musical history and a thriving current-day music scene. Both are being recognized in the Winter 2018 issue of Oxford American. The esteemed literary and arts magazine devotes the entirety the issue to the state’s music and poetry. And in conjunction with the issue, Oxford American hosted a series of events

Carry That Weight: The Heavy Mountain Festival

For many years, Asheville, N.C. has been an important part of the thriving folk/roots music scene. But in recent years the city has also become an incubator for many other musical styles. With a goal of supporting and spotlighting the regional scene for a particularly thunderous brand of rock, Asheville musician and nascent promoter Ray