review Archive

Album Review: Nancy Priddy — You’ve Come This Way Before

In 1967, a young singer named Nancy Lee Priddy was part of a group of musicians assembled to assist in the making of Songs of Leonard Cohen, the debut release by the Canadian songwriter, poet and novelist. Priddy provided backing vocals on three of the album’s tracks, “Hey, That’s No Way to Say Goodbye,” “So

Album Review: Phast Phreddie and Thee Precisions — Limbo

As the seemingly endless parade of retrospective compilations – Nuggets, Pebbles, Green Crystal Ties, Picadilly Sunshine and on and on – has made plain, the mid to late ‘60s were filled with more worthwhile music than any one person could possibly listen to, much less assimilate. But as it turns out, that fact is true

Album Review: John Primer & Bob Corritore – The Gypsy Woman Told Me

Certain cities have a well-deserved reputation for their blues. The Midwestern metropolises of St. Louis, Memphis and Chicago (among others) have rich blues traditions. And the sounds coming out of those cities often bear the stamp of their origin. San Jose, California might not be one of the first cities that comes to mind when

Album Review: Chris Shutters — Good Gone Bad

Still in his 30s, Ohio guitarist Chris Shutters has already made a name for himself. After winning a series of blues and singer-songwriter competitions, he released his solo debut, A World Apart, in 2009. In 2013 he recorded and released a follow-up, Laugh and Roll the Moon. He’s toured with Ginger Baker’s son Kofi Baker

Album Review: Bobby Hatfield — Stay With Me

The history of popular music is scattered with tales of aborted projects, albums that for one reason or another never saw the light of day. Though it finally saw a kind of official release in the 21st century, the Beach Boys’ SMiLE is perhaps the most famous white whale of them all. And in that

Album Review: The Grip Weeds — Giant on the Beach (Deluxe Anniversary Edition)

Without delving too deeply into the semantics of the phrase, defining power pop can be a daunting proposition. There are some fine if a tad lightweight acts whose music gets the power pop tag. But if one goes back to some of its earliest uses – namely when Pete Townshend may or may not have

Book Review: Laurence Myers — Hunky Dory: Who Knew?

When you get right down to it, everybody has a story to tell. Some tales have almost universal appeal, while others are possessed of niche quality. And there’s not really a direct correlation between how compelling or engrossing a story might be and the likelihood that one can score a book deal to write it.

Album Review: Dave Stryker — Blue Soul

Dave Stryker’s a busy guy. In 2014 he released Eight Track, a sort of conceptually unified collection of covers, non-jazz tunes rendered in the jazz idiom and featuring his electric guitar and some tasty vibraphone. Even though that set was something like his 18th album, Stryker seems to have felt he hit a kind of

Album Review: Shplang — Los Grandes Excritos

It’s always a bit of a head-scratcher when a band I’ve never heard of releases a best-of set. But then I remember that – try as I might – for every great artist I discover, there are likely dozens or more that escaped my notice. With that in mind, I popped Los Grandes Excritos into

Album Review: Seiche — Demo Press

By the dawn of the 1980s, progressive rock was decidedly out of fashion. Neither mainstream radio – which never really embraced the genre, save for free-form FM stations – nor the record-buying public showed much interest in the knotty, ambitious and cerebral sounds that a few years earlier had flourished on the music landscape. The