review Archive

Album Review: Gordon Anderson — Moon Man

It’s sometimes said – and unfairly so – that people who are in the business side of the music business are essentially failed, frustrated musicians themselves. My own experience is different: some of my favorite musicians have a foot in both sides of the biz. It’s safe to assume that most if not all of

Album Review: Purusa — Amnesia

Impassioned, minor-key rockers are the chosen approach for this Portland-based indie rock band. Their thoughtful lyrics on cuts like “Julien” mean that the songs hold up to close scrutiny, but for those who’d just as soon rock out, Purusa delivers for them as well. Some of Zach Hinkelman and Kris Kirkman’s guitar textures are vaguely

Album Review: Fernando Perdomo – Out to Sea 3

To the list of artists who release stunning amounts of material – Robert Pollard, R. Stevie Moore – we must now add Fernando Perdomo. The guitarist-producer has been on quite a tear since relocating from southern Florida to Los Angeles some years back. In addition to producing other artists, engaging in tribute and collaboration projects

Album Review: Marvin Gaye — More Trouble

I’ve read critical essays that characterize Marvin Gaye’s Trouble Man as part of a triptych of albums, one of three soundtrack albums for ‘70s “blaxpliotation” films. Yet against the backdrop of Isaac Hayes’ Shaft and Curtis Mayfield’s Super Fly, Gaye’s 1972 album is little known and less remembered. Part of the reason for that may

Album Review: Råttanson — I’d Much Rather Be With the Noise

Nervy, high-octane powerpop is the chosen style for Råttanson, a one-man project from just outside Stockholm. If you’ve discovered the remarkably consistent output from Swedish bands working in the powerpop idiom, you’re likely pre-sold on something like this. Good on you; you won’t come away disappointed. But even those who may not yet have turned

Album Review: Strand — Can’t Trust the Rain

Some of the most enduring rock has come out of Ireland. The Emerald Isle has given us Van Morrison, The Undertones, Thin Lizzy’s Phil Lynott, and even U2 (if you’re so inclined). For a country with a population of less than five million – for comparison, that’s slightly more people than live within the city

Album Review: Nancy Priddy — You’ve Come This Way Before

In 1967, a young singer named Nancy Lee Priddy was part of a group of musicians assembled to assist in the making of Songs of Leonard Cohen, the debut release by the Canadian songwriter, poet and novelist. Priddy provided backing vocals on three of the album’s tracks, “Hey, That’s No Way to Say Goodbye,” “So

Album Review: Phast Phreddie and Thee Precisions — Limbo

As the seemingly endless parade of retrospective compilations – Nuggets, Pebbles, Green Crystal Ties, Picadilly Sunshine and on and on – has made plain, the mid to late ‘60s were filled with more worthwhile music than any one person could possibly listen to, much less assimilate. But as it turns out, that fact is true

Album Review: John Primer & Bob Corritore – The Gypsy Woman Told Me

Certain cities have a well-deserved reputation for their blues. The Midwestern metropolises of St. Louis, Memphis and Chicago (among others) have rich blues traditions. And the sounds coming out of those cities often bear the stamp of their origin. San Jose, California might not be one of the first cities that comes to mind when

Album Review: Chris Shutters — Good Gone Bad

Still in his 30s, Ohio guitarist Chris Shutters has already made a name for himself. After winning a series of blues and singer-songwriter competitions, he released his solo debut, A World Apart, in 2009. In 2013 he recorded and released a follow-up, Laugh and Roll the Moon. He’s toured with Ginger Baker’s son Kofi Baker