rawk Archive

Lake Trout: Weird, Catchy and Everything in Between

Take equal parts pre-Dark Side of the Moon Pink Floyd, Kid A era Radiohead and Soft Bulletin period Flaming Lips, and what do you get? I’d love to report the answer is Baltimore-based Lake Trout, but it’s not that simple. Those influences are certainly there, and in the best way possible, but Lake Trout isn’t

King Khan & BBQ: Exactly the Same, Only Completely Different

The King Khan and BBQ Show is the same as other rock and roll acts, only different. They’re a duo, and the only instruments — both onstage and on record — are guitar, percussion and vocals. Sound familiar? Maybe you’re thinking of The Flat Duo Jets, Dexter Romweber’s band from the 80s. Or maybe the

Tommy Keene in the Naughties (full interview)

In September 2006 I talked with Tommy Keene about his early brush with success, his new record Crashing the Ether, his disdain of genre labels, and much more. While it started out as an interview, it quickly became a conversation. In our lively and wide-ranging talk, we covered a great deal of material. He gave

Tommy Keene in the Naughties (short version)

NOTE: The full text of my 2006 conversation with Tommy Keene is here. It’s like he never left. In fact he didn’t.Tommy Keene’s first major release, 1986’s Songs From the Film was a minor hit on college radio; many saw him then as pop/rock’s Next Big Thing. While his critical stature has never been in

Robyn Hitchcock: Vinyl is Forever

The droll (even by English standards) singer-songwriter Robyn Hitchcock came on the scene in the late 1970s with The Soft Boys, a Cambridge psych-rock group that — depending on one’s viewpoint — appeared too late or too soon. After a string of spotty-or-brilliant (you decide; I’d argue the latter) albums, the band folded, and Hitchcock

Flaming Lips: The Sound of Success

With the charismatic Wayne Coyne fronting the Flaming Lips, it’s easy to overlook the articulate creative expression of Steven Drozd. Steven joined in 1992, ostensibly as their drummer — but quickly assumed the role as a prime mover of all things musical. The relentless contributions of this multi-instrumentalist are a major influence within the ever-expanding

The Fever: Through the Present Darkly

Kemado recording artists The Fever set out a spooky, carnivalesque vibe on In the City of Sleep, their sophomore effort. Taking stylistic cues form Angelo Badalamenti — especially his work with David Lynch on the Twin Peaks soundtrack — The Fever sketch out territory pleasingly (but not overly) familiar to fans of The Cramps, Michael

Dungen: folkrockpsych

Even in the 21st century, the vagaries of transatlantic phone calls are such that bad (or dropped) connections are routine. So it was thanks to some persistence on everyone’s part that this interview even took place. We only got a bit more than halfway through the list of questions, but even in our brief time

DeSol: Here Comes the Sun

A couple years ago, Asbury Park NJ-based Latin-rock artists deSoL were signed to Curb Records, a staid, ultra-square label known for being home to Tim McGraw and (shudder) The Osmonds. If that sounds like a match destined to fail, in retrospect it was. Unhappy with the label’s efforts on their behalf, deSoL recently freed themselves

Interview: Marshall Crenshaw

Marshall Crenshaw is one of rock music’s most underappreciated artists. After a string of critically-acclaimed albums (beginning with his self-titled 1982 debut, right through 2003’s What’s in the Bag?), and a good bit of work in other media (books, films and more) in 2007 he was between record deals. But that didn’t slow him down.