rawk Archive

Album Review: Creedence Clearwater Revival – Ultimate CCR

Few rock acts have seen their catalog subjected to as much incessant compilation-izing as Creedence Clearwater Revival. Not counting live albums and the Golliwogs juvenilia, the group released seven albums in the space of five short years. But no less than a few dozen(!) collections of their music have appeared, starting with Creedence Gold back

Album Review: Clover — Clover and Fourty Niner

Clover doesn’t rank in the top tiers of musical acts in terms of notoriety. Mention their name to most music fans and you’ll earn a blank stare. If they’re known at all, it’s generally for one of two things: the guy who fronted the band in their later days was a singer called Huey Louis

45rpm Roundup

The 45rpm vinyl format isn’t dead. In fact, I see more of those little seven-inchers in my mailbox these days than I did even a couple of years ago. Here I take a look at four recent submissions. None is at all musically like the others, and seven out of the eight songs are highly

A Really Big Shoes Interview, Part 4

Continued from Part Three… Bill Kopp: So Ignition is the first new Shoes album in 17 years. It’s an obvious question, but why so long? John Murphy (bass/vocals): It sounds terrible: eighteen years. And of course there was never any grand plan. I think, when I look back at what was happening in the late

A Really Big Shoes Interview, Part 3

Continued from Part Two… Bill Kopp: I think Shoes fans – especially ones outside the Midwest – think of you more as a studio band. Why don’t you play out more, or tour? John Murphy (bass/vocals): Going back to Elektra again, the labels in those days didn’t have much to do with a band’s live

A Really Big Shoes Interview, Part 2

Continued from Part One… Bill Kopp: I bought the Present Tense LP when it came out; I was 13 (fifteen; Math is hard! — bk). Gary Klebe‘s “I Don’t Miss You” got a decent amount of airplay on the rock FM station in Atlanta. Did you have huge hopes for high-profile mainstream commercial blockbuster success

A Really Big Shoes Interview, Part 1

Shoes are that curious breed: a powerpop band that’s consistently lauded critically, but that makes only occasional modest commercial inroads. They’ve been plying their trade – catchy, muscular, hook-filled rock with stellar vocal harmonies – since the mid-1970s. The band seemed poised for breakout fame – possibly as the Next Big Thing after The Cars

Book Review: Jerry Lee Lewis, Lost and Found

In the 21st century, it’s a bit of a challenge for a writer – even a very good one – to write a book about one of rock’n’roll’s early leaders. Because, of course, it’s all been done before. What could anyone possibly have new to say about such an oft-covered artist as Jerry Lee Lewis?

DVD Review: Johnny Winter — Live Through the 70s

The DVD kicks off with a true oddity, a performance that is bizarre in any number of ways. This excellent-quality Danish TV clip from 1970 finds Winter playing with his original blues rhythm section (Tommy Shannon on bass and Uncle John Turner on drums), but they don’t kick off with a blues tune. Instead they

Album Review: Johnny Winter — The Johnny Winter Anthology

First things first. Whenever a career-spanning anthology crosses this reviewer’s desk, three questions immediately come to mind: Has this artist’s career been summarized on disc before? How’s the sound quality on this disc? Does the package include some sort of added value? The answers to these questions (and to the further questions they suggest) pave