rawk Archive

Let George Thorogood Tell You Something, My Friend (Part One)

At the appointed time, our mutual contact connected me on the phone with George Thorogood. After a second or two of line noise during which all parties adjusted to the phone call, the renowned blues/rock guitarist shouted an enthusiastic “Hello!” down the line. “Hi, George,” I replied. “It’s a pleasure to talk with you today.

Album Review: Hackamore Brick – One Kiss Leads to Another

I don’t deliberately set out to be a contrarian, but it often works out that way. One good example: like most rock critics, I count myself among the fans of The Velvet Underground. But here’s where I go all oppositional: I think their finest work is Loaded. Though I value and enjoy John Cale‘s contributions

Album Review: Tommy Keene – Excitement At Your Feet

There’s a fascinating thread that has run through my interviews with recording artists over the last several years. Not surprisingly, many of my favorite musicians are also world-class fans. And in the more in-depth conversations, talk has often turned to our shared admiration of the work of some other artist. Many of these people –

Album Review: Deniz Tek – Detroit

The American city of Detroit, Michigan has been in the news quite a bit these last few years. The urban decay and financial woes have often overshadowed the city’s proud history as both a center of American industrial progress and a ground-zero for some fine rock’n’roll. As I write this review, the city is embroiled

Album Review: Nektar – Time Machine

In 2013, there aren’t all that many bands making progressive rock of the sort that walked the Earth in the first half of the 1970s. But while the popular thinking is that punk killed off prog, that simply didn’t happen: it merely went back to being a slightly underground movement – as did punk, really

Album Review: The Three O’Clock – The Hidden World Revealed

The whole so-called “paisley underground” scene happened during my college years. Like many of my generation, I had expanded my listening experiences beyond classic rock into what would eventually be known as “college rock.” And through my experience working in a record store, I was exposed to even more then-current music, much of it –

July Capsule Reviews, #2 of 3

Here are four more capsule reviews that fulfill my twin goal of (a) clearing off my desk and (b) getting the word out about some music you’d almost certainly otherwise miss. Today’s selections are of a progressive bent. As is my standard procedure, my self-imposed limit for this particular exercise is 150 words on each

July Capsule Reviews, #1 of 3

Once again, it’s time here at Musoscribe World Headquarters for a batch of capsule reviews. The inbox keeps growing, and some worthy titles have begun to gather dust. So to winnow down my backlog and get the word out about these (largely under-the-radar) new releases, here is the first of three more in my occasional

Album Review: Various Artists — Los Nuggetz: ’60s Garage & Psych from Latin America

During the first four or five years of this new century, there existed online a thriving collector/trading community, dedicated to sharing and disseminating obscure, forgotten and occasionally never-known-about-in-the-first place music from the 1960s. Operating right on the edge of copyright law (well, on the wrong side of it, if truth be told), these collectors shared

EP Review: Drivin’ n’ Cryin’ — Songs from the Psychedelic Time Clock

In terms of delivering new music, Drivin’ n’ Cryin’ is employing a strategy not unlike that of Marshall Crenshaw. Instead of releasing an album after a couple years’ wait, both acts are meting out new music in smaller, EP-sized bites. From a marketing (or fan relations) standpoint, this is a solid approach; it keeps the