psych Archive

New Music Review Roundup, Part 1

I’ve got lots of new music to tell you about. Eighteen albums in all, which I’ll cover over three days. Let’s get started. The Brigadier – Wash Away the Day Imagine a hybrid of mid-sixties Brian Wilson, the Raspberries, Brill Building girl group pop (sung by a guy) and the Rubinoos. Now add a dash

The Black Angels: Slow Death (Part 2)

Continued from Part One… The Black Angels have never been what one would call a commercially-minded group. That said, a few years back Alex told me that “Telephone” off Phosphene Dream was a conscious attempt to reach a wider audience. Would you agree, and if so, to what degree was that successful? Yeah, I guess

The Black Angels: Slow Death (part 1)

The Black Angels are reliable purveyors of a modern rethink of 60s psychedelia. The Austin group’s updated approach is a kind of tribal psych, heavy on droning, hypnotic and irresistible tunes. The group just released Death Song, its fifth (or sixth) album – we’ll explain that in a moment – and is heading out on

Saturday Bonus Post: Short-form Roundup

Now and then I receive an EP or even a single for potential review. In general those don’t make the cut, as I prefer to write about full-length albums that provide a fuller picture of an artist’s work. But when a short-form release rises to the level of something special, I’m happy to cover it.

Album Review: Evolfo — Last of the Acid Cowboys

File next to: Black Keys, King Khan & the Shrines The album’s title might conjure images of – depending on one’s musical frame of reference – the Flying Burrito Brothers or Cracker/Camper van Beethoven. As it turns out, Evolfo has little in common with either. On Last of the Acid Cowboys, the Brooklyn-based band showcases

Arthur Brown’s “Fire” Still Burns (Part 2)

Continued from Part One … Brown believes Tommy is “an amazing piece of work. But rock opera? I don’t buy it. There just isn’t a real name for it.” And so it was with the suite of songs on Side One of The Crazy World of Arthur Brown, with “Fire” as its centerpiece. Brown thinks

Arthur Brown’s “Fire” Still Burns (Part 1)

One of the most remarkable singles in a year full of remarkable music, 1968’s “Fire” was unlike most anything else on the radio. Backed with malevolent swirls of organ and brass punctuating a hard-driving arrangement, the operatic vocals of Arthur Brown made quite an impression on listeners. Opening with the memorable spoken (well, shouted) introduction

Album Mini-review: Chicano Batman — Freedom is Free

File next to: War, Mayer Hawthorne, Sly & the Family Stone The spirit of late-sixties psychedelic soul is alive in Chicano Batman. On this collection of twelve socially aware originals, the Los Angeles quartet – augmented with an alluring female vocal chorus – makes some of the best music of its career. Musically, Freedom is

Chicano Batman: It’s Playtime

The style of music known as “psychedelic soul” enjoyed an all-too-brief heyday in the late 1960s. Deftly fusing elements of African American soul and the dreamier end of psychedelic rock, the genre was exemplified by artists such as Sly & the Family Stone and The Chambers Brothers. But the incredibly rich and varied musical landscape

Quick Takes, Part Three

Today I take a quick look at ten archival releases of note. Tim Buckley — Wings: The Complete Singles 1966-1974 The music of Tim Buckley (yeah, late father of the late Jeff Buckley) has earned a reputation as difficult. And while I’m not here to flatly counter that impression, I must say that this collection