rawk Archive

Album Review: No. 2 – First Love

First things first: this band isn’t thenewno2, Dhani Harrison’s project named after the succession of characters who portrayed the mysterious leader in The Prisoner. No, this No. 2 has been around a bit longer than Harrison’s group, so one might think of it as the “old” No. 2. But hey, they’re new to me, and

Album Review: Eric Slick – Palisades

A former student (alongside his sister Julie Slick) at the Paul Green School of Rock Music, Eric Slick was catapulted to well-deserved fame when Adrian Belew chose him and Julie to work as his rhythm section in the Adrian Belew Power Trio in the mid- to late 2000s. From there, Eric joined Dr. Dog as

EP Review: Salim Nourallah – See You in Marfa

Salim Nourallah is from Texas, but for See You in Marfa, his project collaborator is the great Marty Willson-Piper, former guitarist for The Church and a superb musician, singer and composer in his own right. The album was recorded in Nashville, with Willson-Piper’s guitars (on two tracks) cut in the southwest of England. The five

Album Review: Mark Duda – Bodega Flowers

I’ll be honest: this one confused me. From the Halloween-themed font to the woman on the cover (is that Mark Duda?) And the Japanese(?) lettering, I had no idea at all what to think about this CD. So of course I did what one should do in such cases: play the thing. Thank goodness. It’s

Album Review: The Krayolas — Happy Go Lucky

If the Smithereens were from Texas instead of New Jersey – and if they built on their Beatles influences not by exploring an affinity for Black Sabbath but instead for the Sir Douglas Quintet – then they might sound a bit like The Krayolas. With a chirpy demeanor, jangling guitars and peppy hand claps, The

Concert Review: Interpol (Sep 3 2022, Asheville NC)

It’s been 20 years since Interpol released their celebrated debut Turn On The Bright Lights, an album that came at a time when the indie music scene in New York was booming and entering a new sonic era alongside bands like The Strokes, The Yeah Yeah Yeahs, and LCD Soundsystem. Now, in 2022, Interpol have

Album Review: Jem Records Celebrates Pete Townshend

Too often, various-artists tribute albums are like celebrity roasts: it’s far less about the ostensible honoree, and for more about the roasters (or, in this case, “tributers”). And I’m on record stating my assertion that few tribute projects add much of value to the music. But there are exceptions, and they make the whole concept

DVD Review: Waiting – The Van Duren Story

In recent years, a remarkably personal style of documentary has come into vogue. Whereas in a traditional documentary, the narrator is both invisible and omniscient, and this new (or newly popular) style, the narrator is very much part of the story, and said narrative tends toward subjectivity. In and of itself, the approach is not

Concert Review: Spoon (Sep 3 2022, Asheville NC)

Known for putting on a spirited and memorable show, Spoon’s September 3rd performance at Rabbit Rabbit was alive, dynamic, and tight. The band is touring on their latest record Lucifer on the Sofa, which has received mostly positive reviews 26 years after their 1996 debut Telefono. Since this album is widely considered a return to

John Lennon: Five Sessions Outside the Beatles

More of my “Take Five”… John Lennon is rarely thought of as a session musician; nearly all of his work was within the context of The Beatles, with wife Yoko Ono and/or his own Plastic Ono Band. But between 1965 and his death in 1980, Lennon participated in several notable projects involving other artists. The