rawk Archive

Album Review: Joe Jackson & Todd Rundgren featuring Ethel — State Theater New Jersey 2005

It was more than sixteen years ago that two of popular music’s most iconoclastic artists decided to work together (sort of). Todd Rundgren and Joe Jackson teamed up for a concert tour, and instead of being backed by conventional bands, they chose to work with Ethel, a string quartet (violin, viola, two cellos). It was,

Album Review: Star Collector – Game Day

Devotees of rock and pop will know that “Star Collector” is a classic Monkees tune from their high-watermark 1967 album Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn & Jones Ltd. It’s also the name of a superb melodic rock quartet from Vancouver, British Columbia. Influenced by – but not aping the sound of – revered bands like The Who

Album Review: Wanderlust — All a View

Roch Parisen’s review of Wanderlust’s 1995 debut name-checks some useful touchpoints to place the Nashville band’s music in context: The Searchers, Beau Brummels, Brds and Bay City Rollers. For music lovers of a particular perspective, that’s enough to gain their attention. And though I myself never heard Prize at the time, it’s apparently held in

Album Review: Greg Antista and the Lonely Streets — Under the Neon Heat

When we last checked in with this South California rock quartet about two years ago, they had released their debut album, Shake, Stomp and Stumble. As I wrote at the time, that record featured “concise, taut songs played with verve and conviction.” Two years and a world pandemic later, one thing has changed: guitarist Jessica

Album Review: Snowglobe — Doing the Distance

Doing the Distance is full of surprises, especially for listeners who approach it without preconceived notions. After a brief, brass-centric intro (“Theme Music,”) the group shifts into what initially sounds like a kind of Wilco-influenced country rock. But those horns pop back into the mix, alerting the listener that perhaps Snowglobe has a wider musical

Album Review: Mumps — Rock & Roll This, Rock & Roll That

American pop culture consumers of a certain age (aka television viewers) will recall An American Family, a groundbreaking PBS documentary series that first aired in 1973. Setting aside the fact that the program is to blame for the subsequent rise of “reality” (sic and ugh) television, it was nonetheless important in many ways. One of

More from My Chat with Joe Bonamassa

I recently spoke to blues-rock guitarist Joe Bonamassa ahead of a summer 2021 mini-tour of the West Coast. The interview formed the core of a print feature I wrote. Below is additional content from the conversation, material that didn’t make it into that story. — bk What led to this mini-tour? We did this three-piece

How Joe Bonamassa Spent His (Pandemic) Vacation

When touring musicians were forced off the road in March 2020 by the COVID-19 pandemic, few thought the disruption would last more than a few months. More than 16 months later, life is only incrementally returning to something approximating normal. Ending an extended period during which its stage has gone dark, the San Jose Civic

Album Review: The Beat Farmers — Tales of the New West

One of the more fascinating characteristics of ‘80s new wave / college rock / alternative (or whatever you’d care to call it) was the manner in which it folded in genres of music that had previously been considered outside the scope of pop music. Or at least outside the scope for the population who listened

Album Review: Sweet — Isolation Boulevard

Artists often have very good reasons for re-recording their hit songs. The vagaries of the music industry are such that artists – even ones who wrote their own material – end up not owning the recordings. So when the music gets sold to consumers – or when it’s licensed by music directors for use in