rawk Archive

Sweet Ride: More of My Look Back at Moby Grape with Guitarist Peter Lewis (Part One)

Moby Grape is the prime example of a richly talented group that endured a long series of setbacks; those obstacles blunted the group’s success. Had their luck (and, it must be said, judgment) been better, today the San Francisco quintet might be widely acclaimed as one of the best bands of the late ’60s. In

Moby Grape’s Peter Lewis: A Rock ‘n’ roll Survivor on ‘The Road to Zion’ (Part Two)

Continued from Part One… Peter Lewis’ problems at the time weren’t nearly as severe as those facing Spence, who famously came at band mates Miller and Stevenson with a fire axe. Mosley suffered a breakdown of sorts as well in 1969, abruptly quitting the band and enlisting in the Marines (he was diagnosed as a

Moby Grape’s Peter Lewis: A Rock ‘n’ roll Survivor on ‘The Road to Zion’ (Part One)

Ask a hardcore rock music fanatic to name the most underrated band of the 1960s, and the answer you’re most likely to get is this: “Moby Grape.” Though sometimes credited as an early example of country rock, Moby Grape could rock as hard as any San Francisco band. And the came up with catchy, single-worthy

No Such Thing As Rock ‘n’ Roll: A Conversation with Mott the Hoople’s Morgan Fisher (Part Two)

Continued from Part One… Released in March 1974, The Hoople was the last one that the band made before Ian Hunter left. At that point, was there a sense that the band might not continue? Well, obviously, it was a huge shock because we thought we were about to make it really big. I think

No Such Thing As Rock ‘n’ Roll: A Conversation with Mott the Hoople’s Morgan Fisher (Part One)

Fans were thrilled when in mid 2019 a concert tour was announced, one featuring the core of Mott the Hoople’s mid 1970s lineup. And they were understandably disappointed when in October the tour was postponed – and then canceled. On doctor’s orders, lead singer Ian Hunter was sidelined due to a severe case of tinnitus.

Don’t Ever Change: The Beatles’ ‘Live at the BBC’ at 25

The Beatles’ final album, Let it Be, was released in May 1970. With the exception of the 1977 LP The Beatles Live at the Hollywood Bowl and two same-named but different records titled Rarities in 1978, there would be no release of previously-unheard Beatles music until the middle of the 1990s. That wasn’t the plan.

Album Review: Cary Grace – ‘Lady of Turquoise’

Cary Grace has carved out a fascinating niche in the world of music. Though she got her start in the Nashville singer-songwriter community (she even had Vince Gill play on one of her early albums!), her chosen musical idiom couldn’t be farther from all that. An American expat currently living in the UK, Grace has

Samantha Fish: More Than Just a Girl with a Guitar (Part Two)

Continued from Part One … “Kill or Be Kind” is as far away as you can get from the idea of a song that’s merely an excuse for a guitar solo. I get the sense that you’ve got a confidence that you don’t have as much to prove as you did in the past. Honestly,

The ‘It Was Fifty Years Ago Today’ Tour, Part Two

The continuing story of the Beatles’ White Album Continued from Part One… Todd Rundgren readily admits that he views The Beatles as an uneven record. “The album is incoherent,” he says, “and contains stuff that a lot of us found curious, but not essential, like ‘Revolution 9.’” But he acknowledges that for many listeners it

The ‘It Was Fifty Years Ago Today’ Tour, Part One

The continuing story of the Beatles’ White Album Tribute concerts and tours are a fixture of today’s live music experience. Sometimes they’re self-tribute: Legacy acts take advantage of decades of goodwill and embark on victory-lap tours in which they recreate some of their most revered work. Brian Wilson has been touring for years in support