psych Archive

Album Mini-review: Rose Windows — Rose Windows

File next to: Black Mountain, Black Angels Talk about promise only partially fulfilled. When Rose Windows released Sun Dogs, their 2013, major-label debut, they displayed great potential. With a strong tribal-psych groove reminiscent of Black Mountain, the young Pacific Northwest group seemed posed for great things. So the news in Spring 2015 that they were

Shuggie Otis: The Music Keeps Calling Him Back (Part 4)

Continued from Part Three… Bill Kopp: A lot of highly-regarded musicians have named you as an inspiration. David Byrne was instrumental in the first [2001] CD reissue of Inspiration Information. Lenny Kravitz has said great things about your music. And I hear your influence in some of Prince‘s music. Those are just two examples. What

Shuggie Otis: The Music Keeps Calling Him Back (Part 3)

Continued from Part Two… Shuggie Otis: But the songs kept calling me back. A song would be really good, and I’d think about it, and realize that I have to face whatever it is that’s bothering me about this song. It might be something personal. It’s not not necessarily that the song has anything to

Shuggie Otis: The Music Keeps Calling him Back (Part 2)

Continued from Part One… Bill Kopp: You sent demo tapes to many labels, but nothing happened for years, until the reissue of Inspiration Information with the added Wings of Love material. That you finally got the notice you deserve seems to be more than luck. Why do you think you’re getting noticed now after being

Shuggie Otis: The Music Keeps Calling Him Back (Part 1)

“I look back now,” says Shuggie Otis, “and I think, ‘Wow. I must have a lot of patience!’” The multi-instrumentalist is reflecting on the curious arc of his career so far: his fame began in earnest when he was a young teen, continued into his early twenties, and ended abruptly after the relative commercial failure

Hundred-word Reviews for July 2015, Part 2

Five releases from five acts from five different countries (Poland, The United States, Germany, Belgium and Sweden) are the focus of today’s brief reviews. Lunatic Soul – Walking on a Flashlight Beam Bassist/vocalist Mariusz Duda seems to be taking a cue from the astoundingly busy Steven Wilson; he’s involved in several musical projects all at

Beatles vs. Rolling Stones: Another Round

Back when I was a kid, the Beatles-or-Stones question was a real thing: among my childhood peers, one had to pick a side. That one could like both groups was, it seems, not a concept around which we could wrap our minds. These days I’m much older and slightly wiser, and I enjoy both (Beatles

Album Review: Todd Rundgren — At the BBC 1972-1982

Several years back, Todd Rundgren took a proactive approach to the myriad live recordings that exist documenting his long and varied career. A true renaissance man who engenders fierce loyalty in his fan base, Rundgren may still be a “cult artist,” but he’s one of the most well-documented ones. For many years (during the tape-

Album Review: Gong – I See You

Daevid Allen departed this temporal plane a last week. The music legend was best known as one of the founding members of Soft Machine, Canterbury England jazz/rock heroes. To continental fans, he was equally revered for founding and maintaining Gong, the (more or less) French hippie collective. (Oddly enough, Allen was neither British nor French;

Album Review: Harvey Mandel — Snake Box

Meaning absolutely no disrespect to the artists to whom I refer, the music scene of the late 1960s and early 1970s was filled with what one might call second-string guitarists. These guys (and at this point in history, nearly the entire roster was male) weren’t on the notoriety level of Jimmy Page, John McLaughlin, or