prog Archive

The Magma Mega-interview, Part Three

Continued from Part Two… Do you think of live performance as an extension of that which you create in the studio, or is studio work an attempt to capture the essence of live performance? Well, this could be both ways because usually Magma always plays on stage before recording. Almost all Magma albums were recorded

The Magma Mega-interview, Part Two

Continued from Part One… What do you seek to communicate in the Kobaïan lyrics of Magma’s music? The main purpose of the lyrics is to allow the music to be as expressive as possible. I’m always giving the example of John Coltrane who was playing an instrument; any people who are playing an instrument are

The Magma Mega-interview, Part One

There is almost no useful frame of reference to describe the music of Magma. Founded in 1969 by French pianist/drummer Christian Vander, Magma has never conformed to conventional ideas about genre, or much else for that matter. A constantly rotating lineup of musicians has passed through Magma’s ranks; the band has released more than a

Album Review: The Moody Blues’ ‘Days of Future Passed’

This article appeared originally on BestClassicBands. There wasn’t a great deal of precedent – either within the group or on the pop music landscape – for Days of Future Passed when the Moody Blues recorded their (sort-of) debut album. The British quintet had only just reinvented itself with a new lineup and a new sound,

Hundred-word Reviews for December 2017: Reissues/Compilations

Today I take quick looks – in the form of 100-word reviews – at ten newly-reissued and/or compiled releases. There’s something for everyone – and lots for me – in this stack of discs. Chris Bell – I Am the Cosmos (Omnivore Recordings) In one sense, it’s beyond bizarre that the work of Chris Bell

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A Look Back at ‘Days of Future Passed’ with Founding Moody Blues Ray Thomas and Mike Pinder

This feature appeared originally on BestClassicBands. When most people think of the Moody Blues, the group’s classic 1967 album Days of Future Passed immediately comes to mind. But the Birmingham, England-based group started out years earlier as an r&b outfit. Various members had played together in other bands; one calling itself the Krew Cats –

King Crimson: Don’t Write an Epitaph Just Yet (Part Two)

Continued from Part One… Jakszyk explains the group’s current thinking. “We are embracing the music as a whole, and we are going back and we are playing things that have either not been played in decades, or that have never been played live, ever.” He mentions a suite of songs off one of the group’s

King Crimson: Don’t Write an Epitaph Just Yet (Part One)

Progressive rock giant King Crimson has a long and convoluted history. Founded in 1969 by iconoclastic guitarist Robert Fripp, the group has gone through numerous breakups, reorganizations and lineups of varying character. The current King Crimson configuration is generally considered to be its eighth, or perhaps an expanded version of is eighth: along with mainstay

Crack the Sky’s John Palumbo: Don’t Look Back

The landscape of pop history is littered with one-and-done acts, artists whose first album – no matter how good it might have been – failed or was lost in the commercial marketplace. Nearly all of those groups would fade into obscurity, never again to make an album. Crack the Sky doesn’t fit into this particular