pop Archive

Album Review: Don Nix – Living By the Days

Don Nix is one of those names known mostly to inveterate liner note readers. His excellent 1973 LP Hobos, Heroes and Street Corner Clowns (on Enterpise, a Stax associated label) included two of his three best-known compositions, “Sweet, Sweet Surrender” and “Black Cat Moan.” But those tunes are known to most as cuts on the

Album Review: The Three O’Clock – The Hidden World Revealed

The whole so-called “paisley underground” scene happened during my college years. Like many of my generation, I had expanded my listening experiences beyond classic rock into what would eventually be known as “college rock.” And through my experience working in a record store, I was exposed to even more then-current music, much of it –

Album Review: The Swimming Pool Q’s – The A&M Years

The music scene likes its labels, it it has always been thus. It’s the rare band that defies easy categorization and still enjoys some measure of commercial success; one has to play the game to win, so to speak. But one band that critics and others never really could pin down stylewise was Atlanta’s Swimming

July Capsule Reviews, #3 of 3

Today I present yet four more capsule reviews. Today’s crop includes reissues on the Real Gone Music label. RGM is committed to unearthing long- (and unjustly-) forgotten music, and these four titles — all from the too-often-maligned decade of the 1970s – certainly meet that standard. My self-imposed limit for this particular exercise is 150

July Capsule Reviews, #1 of 3

Once again, it’s time here at Musoscribe World Headquarters for a batch of capsule reviews. The inbox keeps growing, and some worthy titles have begun to gather dust. So to winnow down my backlog and get the word out about these (largely under-the-radar) new releases, here is the first of three more in my occasional

Album Review: Various Artists — Los Nuggetz: ’60s Garage & Psych from Latin America

During the first four or five years of this new century, there existed online a thriving collector/trading community, dedicated to sharing and disseminating obscure, forgotten and occasionally never-known-about-in-the-first place music from the 1960s. Operating right on the edge of copyright law (well, on the wrong side of it, if truth be told), these collectors shared

EP Review: Drivin’ n’ Cryin’ — Songs from the Psychedelic Time Clock

In terms of delivering new music, Drivin’ n’ Cryin’ is employing a strategy not unlike that of Marshall Crenshaw. Instead of releasing an album after a couple years’ wait, both acts are meting out new music in smaller, EP-sized bites. From a marketing (or fan relations) standpoint, this is a solid approach; it keeps the

Album Review: The Turtles – Happy Together (180g vinyl)

In my last entry I covered the new 180-gram vinyl monaural reissue of The Turtles‘ debut LP, It Ain’t Me, Babe. Released in tandem in 2013 on their own FloEdCo imprint was their third album. Eighteen months after It Ain’t Me, Babe (we’re skipping their 1966 LP You Baby, as it hasn’t been re-released on

Album Review: The Turtles – It Ain’t Me, Babe (180g vinyl)

A few weeks ago, I had the honor and pleasure of interviewing Howard Kaylan. For the second time, as it happens. The first was a few years ago in connection with the film My Dinner With Jimi, based on his experiences in The Turtles. This most recent conversation – soon to be a feature here

Hundred Word Reviews: June 2013

Here’s another installment in my occasional series of capsule reviews; this time ’round I’m focusing on new releases from long-established artists who nonetheless aren’t quite household names. My self-imposed limit for this particular exercise is 100 words on each album. House of Love – She Paints Words in Red If you love the jangle of