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Hundred Word Reviews for May 2015, Part 9

Today’s roundup of capsule reviews focuses on reissues or previously-unreleased material by acts who came to prominence (or something approaching it) in the 1980s or later. Old 97’s – Hitchhike to Rhome In the 1950s, country and rock’n’roll were sometimes hard to discern form one another. Then they split into to two very different styles,

Hundred Word Reviews for May 2015, Part 6

Last week I presented 25 capsule reviews; 100 words each, these were quick critical looks at new CD (and vinyl) releases. This week, I dive into the pile of reissue/compilation CDs that have been crowding my office. Don’t mistake my relative brevity for mild praise; all of the discs reviewed deserve attention. Chuck Berry –

Book Review: Mavericks of Sound

There’s something endlessly fascinating about the creative process. And of course it’s not merely one process; it’s wholly unique for each individual. And because that’s true, conversations with those engage in creative output are often illuminating. David Ensminger clearly agrees: he’s compiled a book’s worth of his own conversations into a volume called Mavericks of

Album Review: JJ Cale — Rewind: Unreleased Recordings

To the music-buying public at large, J.J. Cale is little more than a footnote. Some recognize his name and acknowledge he’s the guy who wrote two of Eric Clapton‘s biggest hits, “After Midnight” and “Cocaine.” Some know a bit more, and note that he also composed “Call Me the Breeze” (a popular Lynyrd Skynyrd tune).

Album Review: Sid Griffin — The Trick is to Breathe

In the immediate wake of the excesses brought forth by psychedelia, popular (rock) music took a decided turn toward the simpler, more pastoral. Mere months after Cream were hitting the charts with “Sunshine of Your Love” and Jimi Hendrix was endeavoring to stand next to our fire, groups like The Band were finding success with

Short Cuts: July Mini-reviews, Part One

The in-box here at Musoscribe World Headquarters is overflowing once again, thanks in no small part to my focusing on other matters (including my recent move and impending nuptials) in addition to keeping up my reviewing schedule. So here’s the first in another series of shorter-than-usual reviews. All of these albums were worth my time;

Album Review: Lone Justice – This is Lone Justice: The Vaught Tapes, 1983

One of the most enduring characteristics of 80s “alternative” music was the cross-fertilization between country and rock. This 80s variant rocked harder than earlier efforts by The Byrds and/or The Flying Burrito Brothers, and was exemplified by a number of excellent bands. The Long Ryders, The Blasters, Jason and the Scorchers, BoDeans and Lone Justice

Album Review: Various — The Del Shannon Tribute: Songwriter Vol. 1

The history of rock’n’roll is littered with artists who — for one reason or another – never quite got their due. Del Shannon is on that list. Best known as the man who gave the world the 1961 hit “Runaway,” he also achieved permanent trivia question-fodder status as the first American to cover a Beatles

July Capsule Reviews, #3 of 3

Today I present yet four more capsule reviews. Today’s crop includes reissues on the Real Gone Music label. RGM is committed to unearthing long- (and unjustly-) forgotten music, and these four titles — all from the too-often-maligned decade of the 1970s – certainly meet that standard. My self-imposed limit for this particular exercise is 150

Album Review: Merle Haggard – The Complete ’60s Capitol Singles

First it was Collectors’ Choice Music, and then when they shuttered their label, it was Real Gone Music. Now Omnivore – another boutique label run (in the best way) by crate-digging types – is following suit and putting together complete collections of a- and b-sides of 45rpm singles form an array of important artists. And