country Archive

No Way Out of Here: The Unicorn Story (Part One)

Early demo tapes from Unicorn, a country-rock group and protégés of Pink Floyd’s David Gilmour, show that the underappreciated British group had an authentic yet radio-ready sound that should have caught on. Despite a number of lucky breaks, the well-deserving band never lit commercial fire. But now there’s a new archival release from Omnivore Recordings,

C&W UK Style: David Gilmour’s Pals Unicorn

Few people remember a British band from the 1970s called Unicorn. Though they never found widespread success, the band recorded four major-label albums. Two and half of those were produced by David Gilmour of Pink Floyd. His band’s manager Steve O’Rourke signed Unicorn to a management contract, and got them a record deal as well.

Holly Golightly: The Country-punk-blues One-take wonder

British-born Holly Golightly was an important part of the UK garage-punk scene of the 1990s. Today her music effectively combines that foundation with a sound that draws equally from classic American country and western music. Her latest album, Clippety Clop, was created in her well-established way: working with life-and-music partner Lawyer Dave, Golightly recorded the

Five Questions (and Answers) with Amanda Anne Platt

Led by singer/songwriter Amanda Anne Platt, WNC-based Americana/country band the Honeycutters are a popular draw on the concert and festival circuit. Last year upon returned from a string of live dates in England, the band released its fifth album, Amanda Anne Platt & the Honeycutters. That release marked the first time Platt’s name was featured

The Byrds’ Sweetheart of an Album, 50 Years Later

In the 1960s, the Byrds pioneered folk rock. The chiming electric 12-string guitars on the 1965 singles “Turn! Turn! Turn” and “Mr. Tambourine Man” influenced a generation of musicians. Soon thereafter, the group moved in a more psychedelic and even jazz-influenced direction, exemplified by 1966’s “Eight Miles High.” But thanks to personnel changes and creative

Some Things She Knows: Lee Ann Womack

Lee Ann Womack burst onto the country music scene in the late 1990s; her classic country sound was a recipe for success: Womack was nominated for Female Vocalist of the year at the 1997 Country Music Association Awards. After releasing her second album, 1998’s Some Things I Know, Womack was recognized with five different awards

Album Review: Alien Country – Like My Life Depends On It

A few years back, I recall there was a motion picture called Cowboys and Aliens or somesuch. Based only on the title – I didn’t care to investigate further – I found the film’s high-concept premise to be, well, stupid. So when I came across Like My Life Depends On It, the new album by

Album Review: Hearts Gone South — Little Things

In an era filled with twanged-up, Eagles-style lite rock passing as country, it’s bracingly refreshing to encounter an album of classic country such as Hearts Gone South’s latest, Little Things. Vocalist Trish Tripp knows how to deliver a slyly humorous line with style, and the band’s sound – highlighted by the keening and exciting pedal

Lorrie Morgan: Living the Songs

Singer-songwriter Lorrie Morgan likes to say that her whole life is a country song. Her accumulated life experiences have enhanced her finely-tuned ability to get inside of the songs she sings. “To reach people, you have to be true to the song,” she says. “You’ve got to be able to live it.” The four-times married

Vinyl Roundup Part One

Here’s a look at four new releases, all on my format of choice: vinyl. The Toadies – The Lower Side of Uptown (Kirtland Records) In an era populated by sensitive, navel-gazing neo-alt-folk-Americana acts, it’s refreshing to stumble upon a new release from a band that rocks like in the Old Days™. The Lower Side of