book Archive

Book Review: 108 Rock Star Guitars

There have certainly been rock-related coffee table books before; some of the best and most notable ones include The Beatles Anthology. And among ones that focus more on imagery than text, Hipgnosis’ Storm Thorgerson has done some excellent ones. Among books that focus more on instruments, Andy Babiuk‘s peerless Beatles Gear is among the best.

Book Review: Led Zeppelin on Led Zeppelin

It’s often unfortunate when a writer with an axe to grind pens the history of one of music’s great historical figures. It borders on tragic when such a work – often with its own very narrow point of view – slips into popular consciousness as something approaching a definitive history. It happened with Albert Goldman‘s

Book Review: Who Killed Mister Moonlight?

David J (Haskins) came to fame as a member of goth-rockers Bauhaus, and went on to success with Love and Rockets, solo releases and sideman duties with such greats as Jazz Butcher (Pat Fish). Along the way, he experienced and/or witnessed firsthand some great stories. As it happens he is a masterful storyteller, with a

Book Review: Vinyl Lives On

Florida-based author/journalist James Goss digs his vinyl. Though he never writes about his own interests or collection, his abiding fascination with the medium of vinyl records shines through loud and clear in his writing. His first two books on the subject – Vinyl Lives and Vinyl Lives II – offered profiles of many of the

Book Review: Wounds to Bind

The 1960s music scene was populated with people who – if they survived – have tales to tell. First-hand witnesses to (or participants in) the social and cultural upheavals that changed the way we looked at the world; movers and shakers in the development of new and groundbreaking musical forms: those are the stories we

Book Review: The Next Elvis

There have been countless books written about Elvis Presley and/or the early years of Sun Records in Memphis, Tennessee. But a new book by someone who was there (for a time, at least) sheds some new light on the tiny yet famous and incalculably important label. Barbara Barnes Sims‘ The Next Elvis: Searching for Stardom

Book Review: One Way Out

The members of The Allman Brothers Band – and there have been many – tend to think of themselves as a jazz band. The onstage interplay owes, they argue convincingly, more to a jazz players’ aesthetic than to the comparatively aimless, noodling approach employed by a “jam band.” That surprising fact was but one of

Book Review: Power Pop Prime, Vol. 3

Powerpop fans are in some ways like metal fans. They – or shall I say we – are hardcore fanatics of a narrow slice of the pop music spectrum, and the rest of the world looks on wondering what the fuss is all about: “What’s the appeal?” I come here today not to try to

Book Review: Bob Dylan, American Troubadour

Allow me to begin with some relevant disclosure: I’m much more a “music guy” than a “lyrics guy.” I can know the words to a song – sing along with them after a fashion, even – and not give much more than a passing thought to the meaning behind (or intent within) the lyrics. There

Book Review: Joe Meek’s Bold Techniques

People like sensational stories. It’s an unfortunate fact, because the public’s focus on the superficial and lurid often obscures a deeper, nuanced story beneath. Barry Cleveland is not one of those people who is satisfied – or even interested – in the shallow, sensational stuff. Thank goodness for that, because his book Joe Meek’s Bold