pop Archive

Album Review: Shplang — Los Grandes Excritos

It’s always a bit of a head-scratcher when a band I’ve never heard of releases a best-of set. But then I remember that – try as I might – for every great artist I discover, there are likely dozens or more that escaped my notice. With that in mind, I popped Los Grandes Excritos into

Album Reviews: Various Artists — The Big Stir Singles Series

Back in the days when it still actually played music videos, MTV put together a promo clip featuring David Bowie. The Thin White Duke smiled rakishly at the camera and intoned, “Too much is never enough.” And to make sure viewers got the point, Billy Idol, Cyndi Lauper and The Police told them the same.

New Yorkers in Sheep’s Clothing: The Strangeloves Story (Part Three)

Continued from Part Two… Onstage, the band was a mix of incongruous elements. The typical American audience member of 1965 wouldn’t have known that Australia had neither zebras nor African drums. And things got ever weirder when the Strangeloves went on television. “We were on Hullabaloo,” Gottehrer recalls. “We were introduced by Sammy Davis Jr.,

New Yorkers in Sheep’s Clothing: The Strangeloves Story (Part Two)

Continued from Part One… When it’s suggested that the story sounds like a scene straight out of a motion picture, Feldman agrees. “Listen, our whole career has been something out of a movie,” he says. A whirlwind of songwriting followed in the wake of those episodes. “We wrote songs on order for Chubby Checker, Dee

New Yorkers in Sheep’s Clothing: The Strangeloves Story (Part One)

An edited version of this feature appeared previously in Record Collector. One evening in late November 2018, Lenny Kaye’s phone rang. The music journalist and (since 1971) guitarist for Patti Smith answered, and on the other end of the line was Todd-o-phonic, the disc jockey at WFMU. Todd told him, “You have to come to

Album Review: Pop Co-op — Factory Settings

It was more than a decade ago when the Spongetones released what would turn out to be their final album, Scrambled Eggs. The group went out (recording-wise) on a high note, with a collection of songs that stood nicely against a backdrop of great albums going all the way back to 1982’s Beat Music. But

What Was ‘Losst’ is Now ‘Founnd’: A New Harry Nilsson Album (Part 3)

Continued from Part Two … Harry Nilsson always had definite ideas about how his songs should sound. Even a listen to the piano-and-vocal demo recording of “Without You” from 1971 shows that from the start, he knew where he wanted to take the song’s arrangement. And for the posthumous Losst and Founnd project, efforts were

What Was ‘Losst’ is Now ‘Founnd’: A New Harry Nilsson Album (Part 2)

Continued from Part One … Though a number of posthumous releases followed Nilsson’s death (including several CDs’ worth of previously unreleased session material), Harry’s final project remained unfinished and largely unheard. Nearly a quarter century would pass before Hudson – with the support and cooperation of Nilsson’s estate, Hudson and Grammy-winning label Omnivore Recordings –

What Was ‘Losst’ is Now ‘Founnd’: A New Harry Nilsson Album (Part 1)

Featuring an idiosyncratically spelled title that evokes memories of his 1977 LP Knnillssonn, singer and songwriter Harry Nilsson has returned with Losst and Founnd, his first album of new music in 40 years. That’s an amazing feat for a man who passed away in 1994, but it’s in keeping with his unpredictable nature. Harry Nilsson

Kat Edmonson: Old Fashioned Dreamer

In the era before rock ‘n’ roll, pop music was for adults. And while adult pop continued as a force through the ’60s – witness the careers of Tom Jones, Johnny Mathis and Engelbert Humperdinck as well as Frank Sinatra’s continued run of top 40 hit singles – the category was largely moribund by the