pop Archive

Those Were the Days: Mary Hopkin’s ‘Post Card’ at 50

Mary Hopkin was a mere 18 years old when she was signed to the Beatles’ fledgling record label in 1968. That experience wasn’t her first as a recording artist; she had previously cut an EP of songs in the native language of her home country, Wales. When scenester/model Twiggy saw Hopkin performing on the TV

Manhattan Transfer: The Boy(s and Girls) from New York City

Popular musical styles come and go. But for nearly a half century, the Manhattan Transfer has been dazzling audiences with its unique brand of music, a style that incorporates jazz, pop, standards and modern sounds. The quartet is renowned for its skill at vocalese, the technique of applying vocals and lyrics to tunes originally created

Procol Harum’s Salad Days (Are Here Again) Part 2 of 2

Continued from Part One… Novum stands on its own as an excellent album of new material. Can you tell me about the circumstances leading to making the first new Procol Harum album in many, many years? Well, that’s a very nice comment, I must put in there. Thank you very much. Because that is something

Procol Harum’s Salad Days (Are Here Again) Part 1 of 2

Formed in 1967, the sophisticated and forward-looking British band Procol Harum had its origins in a very different outfit, the Paramounts. Along with pianist/singer Gary Brooker, guitarist Robin Trower, multi-instrumentalist Chris Copping and drummer B.J. Wilson were part of a group that focused on American-style rhythm and blues. The band scored a UK Top 40

Elton John’s Well-deserved Victory Lap

It may be difficult to remember all the details after all these years, but on the occasion of what looks to be his farewell-to-touring tour, it’s worth taking a look back to recognize the cultural phenomenon that is Sir Elton John. Trained from a young age at London’s prestigious Royal Academy of Music, John (then

Emma’s Lounge: All Over the Board

When it comes to making music, eclecticism for its own sake can be confusing for potential listeners. But when it’s executed with authenticity, casting a wide stylistic net can make for compelling music. And that’s the goal of self-described folk-wave group Emma’s Lounge. In celebration of the release of its new album, Confluence, the Asheville-based

EP Review: Damon Mitchell – Elise

Bright, intelligent pop is the métier of Damon Mitchell. Fans of Owsley, Jellyfish, Ben Folds and similar purveyors of pure pop will find much to like in these six tunes. “Heist” sports some falsetto vocals that recall the best qualities of early Beach Boys, with a good bit of quirk added. The wonderfully melancholy “Just

Hundred-word Reviews, March 2019 Part Two

Yesterday I covered ten albums in 1000 words. Today I’ll do the same. All titles are new or recent releases. Shumaun – One Day Closer to Yesterday I love me some atmospheric, progressive leaning and ambitious music. And that’s what’s on offer within One Day Closer to Yesterday. The music has hints of Pink Floyd,

Hundred-word Reviews, March 2019 Part One

I can’t point to specific reasons as to why this is the case, but in recent months there has been more than the typical amount of really good music finding its way onto my desk here at Musoscribe World Headquarters. What that means, of course, is that it’s time once again for a clutch of

Hot off the Press: Redd Kross’ Hot Issue

This is the second of three non-overlapping Redd Kross features. Enjoy. — bk In a way, Redd Kross is a band captured in time. When brothers Jeff and Steve McDonald launched their punk group in their hometown of Hawthorne, California (a fertile musical ground that also gave the world the Beach Boys and Emitt Rhodes),