prog Archive

Video Roundup 2018

Covering DVDs and Blu-Rays takes more time than reviewing albums; I have to set up in my living room, with a recliner, a couple of cats and (generally) a good Scotch In order to do so. So with a general yet heartfelt apology for the delayed nature thereof, here’s my take on five titles released

I Talk to the Wind (and Other Instruments): The Ian McDonald Interview, Part Two

Continued from Part One… By 1976 McDonald was involved in the founding of a new and very different group. Joined by ex-Spooky Tooth guitarist Mick Jones and American singer Lou Gramm, McDonald launched Foreigner. The group would go onto become one of the biggest-selling acts of the rock era, and the music it made seemed

I Talk to the Wind (and Other Instruments): The Ian McDonald Interview, Part One

Ian McDonald’s career has taken some seemingly unexpected twists and turns. The singer, songwriter and instrumentalist played with an embryonic version of groundbreaking progressive rock group King Crimson, and was a key figure in the critical success of the band’s debut album. A few years later, he co-founded Foreigner, one of the most popular acts

The Yuka & Chronoship Interview, Part Three

Continued from Part Two… Not lost in translation Both Funakoshi and Taguchi understand a bit of English, as evidenced when they would begin laughing or responding even before the interview questions were translated. But with the exception of the occasional guest vocal — like Curved Air’s Sonja Kristina’s lead on the Ship track “Tears of

The Yuka & Chronoship Interview, Part Two

Continued from Part One… The keyboardist’s gear While Funakoshi’s compositions lent themselves to a progressive context, it was a different story when it came to her her playing style. Prior to forming Yuka & Chronoship, the keyboardist had played acoustic piano; she had never laid hands on an electronic instrument, much less a synthesizer. “The

The Yuka & Chronoship Interview, Part One

Yuka Funakoshi’s musical journey has followed a circuitous path. The Japanese keyboardist, songwriter and vocalist was classically trained, but became an established presence in her home country’s J-pop scene. A decade-plus later, Funakoshi has released Ship, the fourth album credited to Yuka & Chronoship, a progressive quartet that — at first blush, anyway — seems

Hundred-word Reviews, December 2018

This will almost certainly be my last roundup of new releases – capsule review style – for 2018. Lots of great music came out this year; don’t let anyone tell you differently. As always, each of these albums deserves more coverage than I’m able to give here, and each warrants a spin (at least) by

A Look Back at the Tubes’ ‘Remote Control’

The Tubes were among the most outrageous of 1970s rock groups. With an impressively muscular and underrated instrumental foundation, the group – or at least lead singer Fee Waybill – acted out the band’s bizarre tunes live onstage. Songs like “White Punks on Dope,” “Don’t Touch Me There” and “Mondo Bondage” were clever to begin

Before and Beyond with Yes Guitarist Steve Howe

Progressive rock giant Yes is currently on tour celebrating the band’s 50-year anniversary. Today the group is led by Steve Howe, Yes’s longtime guitarist (he joined in 1970 and has been with the band through most of its albums). Just ahead of the tour, Howe took the time to answer a few questions about the

Album Review: Patrick Grant – Fields Amaze and Other Strange Music

Anything that crosses my desk and making mention of Philip Glass warrants a closer link. But the placid soundscapes of Glass’ work aren’t at all what you’ll find within Fields Amaze. This is a remixed, remastered, re-whatever of Patrick Grant’s 1998 work. Created for percussion and tuned instruments, it’s a varied collection of instrumentals that