pop Archive

Album Review: The Chills — Somewhere Beautiful

While I choose to believe that – on some exceedingly modest level – I have reasonably good critical sense of measure where music is concerned, I have no illusions about my skills on the commercial side of things: my commercial instincts are close to nil. Were it up to me, we’d all live in a

News on a Long Awaited Reissue

Readers who check out my writing more than occasionally will know of my keen interest in the music and the history of Paul Revere and the Raiders. One of my earliest memories – as a toddler in Poughkeepsie, NY, an hour or so north of New York City – is seeing a group of Revolutionary

Digital December

Longtime readers will know that I review digital releases only in the rarest of cases. Only slightly more often will I cover physical releases for which I have access only to a download (or even more rarely, a stream). However, on special occasions, I’m happy to make exceptions. Said occasions are generally this: the music

Clearing the Backlog: Ten Micro-reviews

As the end of 2013 closes in, I look at my inbox and see a massive stack of CDs. Best as I try, I don’t always follow a first-in/first-out policy with regard to covering releases I find worthy. And while my occasional capsule reviews do help reduce the pile of CD on my desk, today

Album Review: Jellyfish — Radio Jellyfish

It’s pointless (not to mention plain wrong) to argue against the assertion that the “unplugged” concept had played itself out by the middle of the 1990s. But the format – originally devised (with others) by Jules Shear – was itself a good one: stripped-down, intimate live performances of rock songs. That concept was oft-abused and

Album Review: Various — Pete Townshend’s Jukebox

UK-based Chrome Dreams has released a number of these Jukebox titles over the last few years, including titles exploring the influences upon Keith Richards, Bob Dylan, Paul McCartney and even The Grateful Dead. And while some of these artists have endeavored to do something similar themselves (McCartney’s 1999 Run Devil Run comes to mind), the

Richard Barone on The Bongos’ Phantom Train (Part Two)

Continued from Part One… I observe that Phantom Train is somehow less “80s” sounding than any of The Bongos‘ other records, and wonder aloud whether that’s due to the approach they used in recording the album. “Each album is very different,” Richard Barone says. “Drums Along the Hudson is like a garage rock record. With

Richard Barone on The Bongos’ Phantom Train (Part One)

Measured by album releases, The Bongos‘ musical career lasted a mere six years. The Hoboken NJ-based group released EPs in 1980 and 1982, and three albums between 1982 and 1985. And as far as nearly everyone knew, the group left RCA and split shortly thereafter, with each of its members (most notably singer/guitarist Richard Barone)

Roger Hart: Monkees to His Madness (Part Two)

Continued from Part One… Roger Hart – manager of Paul Revere and the Raiders during the 1960s – picks up his story about developing the treatment Madness, an idea that he says was realized as the hit TV show The Monkees. – bk “And,” he continues, “I gave it to one of the program directors

Roger Hart: Monkees to His Madness (Part One)

Fans of 1960s pop are – to varying degrees – familiar with Paul Revere and the Raiders; the band enjoyed a long string of hit albums and singles that stretched into the 70s. And thanks to their high visibility via the weekday television program Where the Action Is, the Raiders influenced a generation, not least