paul revere and the raiders Archive

Keith Allison: Man of Action (Part Five / conclusion)

Continued from Part Four… Bill Kopp: You first rose to fame as a cast member on Where the Action Is. Can you tell me how you got that gig? Keith Allison: At the time, I was playing with The Crickets, as their guitarist. But when in town, I did all the Boyce and Hart demos

Keith Allison: Man of Action (Part Four)

continued from Part Three… Bill Kopp: A guy I vaguely know put together some unauthorized DVDs of It’s Happening episodes. He sent me copies and I reviewed them. The next day he got a cease-and-desist order from Dick Clark Productions! Keith Allison: I just talked to the archivist over there [at DCP]. They contacted me;

Keith Allison: Man of Action (Part Three)

Continued from Part Two… Bill Kopp: I ought to know the answer to this, but did any of your solo singles or the In Action album make a dent on the charts? Keith Allison: They didn’t do much of anything. “Action Action” was what you’d call a turntable hit. The show [Where the Action Is]

Keith Allison: Man of Action (Part Two)

Continued from Part One… Bill Kopp: You cut a couple singles with Mark Lindsay and Steve Alaimo as The Unknowns… Keith Allison: Mark and I, of course, were signed to other labels, so that’s what we had to do. We couldn’t put our names on the record. We cut those at Radio Recorders in Santa

Keith Allison: Man of Action (Part One)

Calling singer-songwriter-actor-musician Keith Allison a Zelig of rock music is a bit wide of the mark, but the Texas-born Allison does seem to have shown up at key points in the pop music scene of the 1960s. Originally a member of the post-Buddy Holly lineup of The Crickets, he went on to fame as a

DVD Review: Happening ’68 Vols. 1-3 (Part Two)

Continued from Part One… The aforementioned Aretha Franklin segment is of particular interest, as it shows the off-the-cuff nature of the program. As Lindsay is discussing the soul singer’s career with guest Jackie DeShannon, they note that Aretha was “on Columbia” (also Paul Revere and the Raiders‘ label) for five years, but “didn’t go anywhere.”

DVD Review: Happening ’68 Vols. 1-3 (Part One)

Though it’s often forgotten today, in the mid 1960s, Paul Revere and the Raiders were just about the most prominent rock’n’roll band in popular culture. Sure, The Beatles had their records all over the charts, and had films like A Hard Day’s Night and Help! And yes, The Monkees had their own weekly television show.

The Brotherhood / Phil Volk Interview, Part Seven

Continued from Part Six… Bill Kopp: For me, from a musical standpoint, there’s a paradox where the two Brotherhood albums are concerned. Of course it goes without saying that I am a big fan of both (and the Joyride album as well), but what’s fascinating to me is that the original band labored over the

The Brotherhood / Phil Volk Interview, Part Six

Continued from Part Five… Bill Kopp: We’ve spoken in the past about Brotherhood recordings that might still be “in the can.” I know that no finished cuts – that is, songs that were fully recorded and mixed down from multi-tracks – exist beyond what’s on the albums – But are there multitracks out in your

The Brotherhood / Phil Volk Interview, Part Five

Continued from Part Four… Bill Kopp: I understand you remained close to Drake Levin in the post-Brotherhood years. I believe you mentioned that the two of you even played music together on an informal basis in the years before his passing. Can you tell me about that? Phil “Fang” Volk: Drake and I stayed in