david bowie Archive

An American in London: The Shel Talmy Interview, Part One

In the history of rock and pop, it’s rare that a producer becomes a “rock star.” Certain names have become prominent fixtures in the audio part of pop culture: Phil Spector and George Martin are among the most well-known producers of the 1960s. In later years, Quincy Jones, Jeff Lynne, Brian Eno and Rick Rubin

Album Mini-review: David Bowie — Blackstar

In some quarters, Blackstar has been characterized as a “jazz” album. That’s not accurate: though instrumentation closely associated with jazz (most notably saxophone) is employed throughout the album’s seven tracks, the uses to which those instruments are put are decidedly not jazz. Distorted electric guitar crops up fairly often as well – most prominently on

Book Review: Experiencing David Bowie

A few years back, Book publishers Rowman & Littlefield initiated an intriguing series. Each book in that series – each with its own author – would explore a particular slice of music, be it a genre (say, jazz) or artist (Led Zeppelin, for example). The author would endeavor to provide the reader with a new

DVD Review: David Bowie – The Calm Before The Storm: Under Review 1969-1971

It’s a shopworn cliché to claim that David Bowie is and has always been a chameleon. Yes, his music and onstage/public person have gone through a series of calculated ch-ch-changes (there; got that out of the way quickly), but his work has proceeded I nan arguably very linear fashion. Another in the long series of