r&b Archive

Capsule Reviews: And Yet Three More from Real Gone Music

Here’s the third of four collections of brief reviews of recently-released reissues and/or compilations from Real Gone Music. Dr. John, The Night Tripper – GRIS-gris Dr. John (aka Mac Rebbenack) was a well-known fixture on the New Orleans music scene long before he cut this, his debut album in 1968. And while he’d later enjoy

Capsule Reviews: Three More from Real Gone Music

Continuing from yesterday’s collection, here are more quick looks at recently-released reissues and/or compilations from Real Gone Music. Toomorrow: Original Soundtrack Album Seeing the names Harry Saltzman (of James Bond film fame) and Don Kirshner (of, well, Don Kirshner fame/infamy) emblazoned across the cover of this 1970 curio suggests we’re in for something that might

Capsule Reviews: Three from Real Gone Music

Because there’s so much of a backlog here at Musoscribe’s palatial new World HQ ( I moved recently), here’s the first of at least three collections of short reviews. These are all reissues or compilations on the Real Gone Music label, renowned (along with Rock Beat, Omnivore, Numero and a select few others) for their

Book Review: Huey “Piano” Smith and the Rocking Pneumonia Blues

One need not dig very deep into the collected history of popular music to discover tales of artists who’ve been ripped off, gotten the short end of the stick, been robbed or gotten screwed. And for a long list of reasons – many of which have to do with our country’s history of racism –

Album Review: David Ruffin – My Whole World Ended / Feelin’ Good

Sure, everybody knows The Temptations, and their many hits, including “My Girl,” and “Ain’t Too Proud to Beg,” both featuring lead vocals of David Ruffin. But fewer – especially those who followed the pop charts rather than the R&B one – are familiar with Ruffin’s solo work. This set pairs Ruffin’s first two albums (both

Ask Me Some Questions: The Graham Parker Interview, Part 4

Continued from Part Three… Bill Kopp: As much as I love your songwriting, two of my favorite tunes of yours have always been “Hold Back the Night” and “I Want You Back,” both soul/r&b covers. How did you discover that sort of music when you were young, and – since it has clearly influenced your

Ask Me Some Questions: The Graham Parker Interview, Part 3

Continued from Part Two… Bill Kopp: As the new Ask Me No Questions documentary points out, you parted ways with The Rumour after The Up Escalator (1980), but with the exception of Another Grey Area (1982), you pretty much continued to work with guitarist Brinsley Schwarz on many of your recordings. What was it about

Ask Me Some Questions: The Graham Parker Interview, Part 2

Continued from Part One… Bill Kopp: In the new documentary film Don’t Ask Me Questions, you come off very authentically as a sensitive, soft-spoken individual. But back in the 80s, like many people, I think, I was convinced of your reputation as an angry, sort of perhaps even confrontational artist. How and why do you

Ask Me Some Questions: The Graham Parker Interview, Part 1

Once pegged as one of rock’s angry young men, these days Graham Parker is neither angry nor young. And while his profile these last few decades has been lower than in his commercial heyday (1976 to the mid 80s, and even then only a modest commercial success), Parker has continued to release a remarkably consistent

Album Review: Tower of Power — Hipper Than Hip

For quite a number of years – primarily the mid 90s to around 2006 – I was immersed in a consuming hobby of sorts: I collected and traded bootlegs (aka ROIOs or recordings of indeterminate origin). For me, listening to unreleased recordings of artists I like – studio outtakes, live concert tapes, radio broadcasts and