rod argent Archive

Album Review: The Zombies — Greatest Hits

The Zombies have a sterling and well-deserved reputation. That reputation is built primarily on three things: a couple of early singles, a final album of staggering quality, and a latter-day, 21st century renaissance in which the group finally capitalizes on those first two things, while proving it has plenty more to offer. And its that

The Zombies: A Half-century ‘Odessey’

During 1967’s so-called Summer of Love, the Zombies began recording what would be their defining work, the critically-acclaimed album Odessey and Oracle [sic]. But on its release, the record performed disappointingly on the charts in America as well as in the band’s native England. “When we recorded it, there was no commercial success with this

Album Review: The Zombies — Still Got That Hunger

File Next to: The Left Banke, Argent, The Kinks Call them late bloomers if you will. Compared to their fellow British invaders, The Zombies scored relatively few hits in the USA. And by the time their masterpiece, 1968’s Odessey and Oracle (sic) started to gain any traction, the group’s members had gone their own ways.

Zombies Among Us: A Conversation with Rod Argent and Colin Blunstone (Part Three)

Continued from Part Two… One thing that has changed – somewhat – is Rod Argent‘s keyboard arsenal. “I would only ever use my real [Hammond] C3, a Leslie [rotating speaker], and a beautiful Steinway concert grand piano in the studio. When we are recording an album, that goes without saying.” “But,” Argent admits, “on stage,

Zombies Among Us: A Conversation with Rod Argent and Colin Blunstone (Part Two)

Continued from Part One… “I can’t tell you why [Odessey and Oracle] wasn’t successful when it first came out,” offers Rod Argent, “unless it was the fact that everything was so much more based in the country where you lived in at that time. And we only ever had one hit in the UK. Fewer

Zombies Among Us: A Conversation with Rod Argent and Colin Blunstone (Part One)

The Zombies are among the fondly-remembered cast of characters from the British Invasion (or, as they somewhat more succinctly call it in the UK, the Beat Era). While they certainly didn’t rock as hard as The Who, Yardbirds, or The Kinks, and enjoyed nowhere near the level of chart success that The Beatles and Rolling