thelonious monk Archive

Album Review: Vito Dieterle and Joel Forrester – StatusSphere

Jazz fans are likely to pick up on the in-joke of this album’s cover art immediately. It’s a visual homage to the 1957 LP Monk’s Music. And the two round objects in the wagon are a nod to Thelonious Monk’s nickname, “Sphere.” StatusSphere is, then, a fitting name for a Monk tribute. Vito Dieterle plays

Reviews: 12 Jazz Reissues (Part One)

Albert Ayler Quartet – Copenhagen Live 1964 (hatOLOGY) The music of tenor saxophonist Albert Ayler (1936-1970) is assuredly not for the jazz novitiate. With an approach that makes Ornette Coleman sound mainstream, Ayler pushed even the boundaries of free jazz. Released in cooperation with the musician’s estate, this never-before-heard live session from more than a

Album Mini-review: Terry Adams — Talk Thelonious

File next to: NRBQ, Professor Longhair, Joe Jackson Though he’s rightly revered now, for much of his career jazz pianist Thelonious Monk was considered the maker of some dissonant, even sloppy music. Even today his music is more difficult than, say, anything from the Bill Evans catalog. But longtime Monk acolyte Terry Adams – who

Album Review: Thelonious Monk — The Complete Riverside Recordings

In my final year of college, I was exceedingly fortunate to have signed up for a course called American Popular Music History: Stephen Foster to the Present. There were only six of us in the class, and our professor was one Murray Silver; he had just co-authored Myra Lewis‘ book, Great Balls of Fire. But

August Jazz Roundup #2

The esteemed Concord Music Group continues its series of thoughtful reissues of jazz classics from its catalog holdings with five titles originally issued on the Riverside label. I covered Chet Baker Plays the Best of Lerner & Loewe back at the beginning of the month; here’s some quick looks at the other four in this

The Very Best Of…Concord Jazz Artists

Because Concord Music Group has acquired the licensing to some of the most venerable labels in all of music (Stax, Fantasy, Riverside, Prestige, and others) as well as large chunks of the work of some of the world’s most important artists (Ray Charles and Frank Sinatra), they have – in addition to their excellent reissues