pop-o-pies Archive

Album Review: The Sound of Glassboro, 1980s

The reductive nature of popular culture dictates that when we recall the 1980s, we’re supposed to think of shoulder pads, big hair and vacuous MTV-era acts like Thompson Twins. But as those of us who came of age in that era know, the ‘80s also saw the ascendancy of punk and new wave and the

Always Comes Back: 415 Records and the SF New Wave Scene (Part 3 of 3)

Continued from Part Two… The Uptones Ska was relatively unknown in the United States when The Uptones got their start. Eric Din – who still leads a version of The Uptones today – recalls that he and a bunch of high school friends formed the group in 1981 to play the kind of music made

Always Comes Back: 415 Records and the SF New Wave Scene (Part 2 of 3)

Continued from Part One… The Mutants In late 1978, Sally Webster had a giant loft on First and Mission where she often held salon-type events. “A lot of bands played there for their first time; it was sort of an experiment, but it was super fun.” She and some friends recruited musicians “who could actually

Always Comes Back: 415 Records and the SF New Wave Scene (Part 1 of 3)

An edited version of this feature appeared previously as a cover story in SF Weekly. And LATE BREAKING NEWS: My book about 415 Records will be published in 2021. — bk In the mid- and late ’60s Howie Klein was a student at Stony Brook University on Long Island, 50 miles outside New York City.